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Modifying Full Throttle Upshifts BW M12

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farna View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote farna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/29/2021 at 4:16pm
Correct, but the D2 position was the "first" D position (right after Neutral). Most people unfamiliar with the trans pull it into that position and assume they have a two speed trans. The "middle" of the forward drive ranges shifts all three gears. D2 wasn't intended just for slippery surfaces, but was intended to be the main forward drive position, with D1 used only on hills or when loaded. The idea was to start in a higher gear and let the torque converter get you started so the car would up-shift to high as soon as possible. It was supposed to be an economy measure, but only if you start slow. If you start quickly (just about have to in today's traffic!) it's better to pull it into D1 all the time. The engine will work a little less getting up to speed, and economy will actually improve over trying to get up to speed quickly by starting in second.

There is a big difference in the way people who came up in the 40s and early 50s drive and the way we drive now! Most don't realize how different people used to drive during different decades. When cars first started hitting the road in the early 1900s you had to be part mechanic, and if you drove 50 miles in a day you were driving a lot! Most people drove no more than a couple hundred miles a week, if that. 10,000 miles would wear half the parts on a car out at that time! Even in the 60s 100K on a car meant that it was pretty much worn out and it was hard to get much if you traded it in or tried to sell with over 100K -- I remember my father and grandfather stating that their car had 80K on it -- time to start looking for another! Now 200K is just good broke in, you have at least another 100K to get out of it! My 2003 Toyota Tundra work truck is a bit beat up now (I do home repairs out of it, so always hauling something!), but it has 264K miles on it and shows no signs of slowing down. Only regular maintenance items done to it. Might have to replace the power steering rack or pump soon... I have to put fluid in it every couple weeks now (I average 250-300 miles a week). Both are original to the truck, never replaced!



Frank Swygert
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote george w Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/29/2021 at 5:19pm
Frank, I can’t speak for AMC cars built before the 1967 model year but according to the owners manual for my 67 Ambassador ( which I bought new ) D-1 is the intended primary driving range for best economy and performance.. The manual suggests using D-2 range when starting out on slippery surfaces. As for the position of the D-1 and D-2 ranges on the quadrant all I can say is that all Ford Cruise O Matics used the same placement for the primary , all 3 forward speeds, range. That is the position just to the left of L range. Cruise O Matic did not always use the D-1 and D-2 notations. Instead they had two “dots”. The D-1 range was designated with a large dot with a green center and the D-2 range had a smaller white dot to it’s left. I grew up with a lot of Ford products in the late 50s to mid 60s so I was quite familiar with the Cruise O Matic quadrants. IIRC, Cruise O Matic was introduced in Ford cars in 1958 and at that time the quadrants were marked D-1 and D-2. I believe Ford went to the “dots” sometime in the mid 60s.
Long time AMC fan. Ambassador 343, AMX 390, Hornet 360, Spirit 304 and Javelin 390. All but javelin bought new.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Buzzman72 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/29/2021 at 6:25pm
AMC went to the Borg-Warner automatic beginning with the push-button setup in 1958. The '57 automatic was the "Flashaway" Hydramatic built by GM, so the "Flash-O-Matic" name for the Borg-Warner was meant to be a subtle change. Sometime between the '54 Hornet's brief use of Borg-Warner's Detroit Gear DG-200 [after the Hydramatic plant burned in Ypsilanti], designed jointly by Studebaker and B-W, and the debut of the Flash-O-Matic, BW ash-canned the lockup torque converter. 

When I got my drivers license in 1970, before I got my '57 Rambler 20-series on the road I drove my dad's '61 Rambler Classic with the 196. It would hold L range to 60 MPH if you floored it, but not upshift until you selected a different button. In D1/D2, the car still topped out at about 90, which was sufficient for a new driver with a high lead content in the right foot. [The '57 Rambler with the 250 V8 and Hydramatic would top out at 120 MPH @ 6000 rpm, and would do it until you ran out of road to run that fast.]

As a teenager in that '61, I primarily used the D1 position. Dad primarily used D2. Gas was 32.9 cents a gallon then for the name-brands, and so we never paid that much attention to whether my way used more gas.



Edited by Buzzman72 - Nov/29/2021 at 6:28pm
Buzzman72...void where prohibited, your mileage may vary, objects in mirror may be closer than they appear, and alcohol may intensify any side effects.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tomj Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/30/2021 at 12:02am
Originally posted by george w george w wrote:

Frank, I can’t speak for AMC cars built before the 1967 model year but according to the owners manual for my 67 Ambassador ( which I bought new ) D-1 is the intended primary driving range for best economy and performance..

Lol, the owner's manual for my 1960 American suggests using D2 for most driving, and D1 when you need extra power! This was a flathead with the cast-iron M8 transmission -- so yeah, you might want "extra power"!


1960 Rambler Super two-door wagon, OHV auto
1961 Roadster American, 195.6 OHV, T5
http://www.sr-ix.com

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WesternRed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/30/2021 at 2:35am
I reckon I used to be able to hold 2nd to higher RPM, but now it does the auto upshift around 5200 as mentioned above, maybe the governor came unstuck or something on the last rebuild.
I've finally given up drinking for good...........now I only drink for evil.
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