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Metal prep

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rsrguy3 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rsrguy3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Metal prep
    Posted: Jan/25/2022 at 8:02am
What do you like to use on raw steel to prep for epoxy primer? 
javguy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Trader Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/25/2022 at 10:32am
If it's all clean, a final wash with acetone and dry air to remove any oils (usually from the inherent habit of people touching just before applying primer) and dirt. Acetone evaporates quickly and primer can be applied within a few minutes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hassyfoto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/26/2022 at 4:22am
There are many ways and products to prep the metal. I like to use as two part system and  on occasion a three part system. As already mentioned Acetone can be used and available from local stores. If the metal has any surface imperfections I will use a metal prep, then wipe down with a damp rag ( multiple no lint towels) and finally with a "wax and grease remover". .
Most products that remove oil based contamination ( oil in the skin, shop products, etc) do not necessarily remove water based products, ( soda, food etc). ( Something that was on your hand or placed on the car). . 
Sometimes with surface imperfections, a metal prep product is used to help eliminate possible surface contamination. These products can be expensive and can require multiple steps for application and removal. .
There is plenty of information on the internet about professional products used in a shop. I would do some homework and decide on what best fits your particular situation. 


Edited by hassyfoto - Jan/26/2022 at 4:24am
Murphy's Law:
Any given mechanical job you decide to solve alone will imminently require a third hand, at its most critical moment

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mmaher94087 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/26/2022 at 10:13am
Don't forget a Silicon remover.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Steve_P Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/26/2022 at 3:56pm
all of the auto paint mfgrs sell a product called something like "wax and grease remover".  It's not cheap, but a gallon will do many cars.  If you want to etch the metal, like done at the factory, POR15 makes an awesome product to do this.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RogerS. Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/26/2022 at 6:00pm
 I highly recommend a product from Sherwin Williams called R7K158.  Fast drying and removes wax, oil, grease and silicone.  It's impressive what it will put on a rag even after an initial good cleaning with either lacquer thinner or mineral spirits.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote First_Gear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/07/2022 at 12:10pm
I wash raw sandblasted parts with dawn dish soap and a stiff brush. Use hot water and dry it quickly with air to prevent rust. I don't like using solvents and a rag because the lint becomes stubbornly affixed to sandblasted metal (ask how I know)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Regamble1969 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/18/2022 at 1:23am
If sanded to metal: If the metal has been sitting for more than a day, sand it with a red scotch brite or 320-600g sand paper. After that, use a wax and grease remover to clean the metal (follow the directions carefully, I've seen more than one paint job ruined by not following the directions carefully). If you don't have any, a decent lacquer thinner will work in a pinch, but go over it twice at least. Wipe it on with one hand while drying it off with a clean, dry towel in the other hand. Don't let it evaporate off, wipe it off while it's still wet. Do small areas like 1/2 a fender or 1/2 a door to make sure you're getting it off while it's still wet then move on. Use a different rag for drying  on each section and turn it over as the product dries to keep from running a contaminated rag over the area. Then tack rag and shoot the epoxy.

After blasting: use a red scotch brite with lacquer thinner to clean the surface of the blast media. Then I use an after blast metal prep (Eastwood's has a pretty good one that's not horrible price). After blast is like cold galvanizing and will protect the metal from flash rust. Then, same as sanding, grease and wax then tack rag and shoot the epoxy.

Remember, epoxy primer should have a 15min induction period. This means that you mix it really good with the catalyst and reducer (if applicable) and leave it in the mixing cup for at least 15min. Do not skip this step. And this induction period is at 70° so if it's colder, give it more time. They usually have about an 8 hour pot life so letting it induce for 30-45min isn't going to hurt. Then stir, pour, tack rag, and shoot.
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