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Basic AMC V8 Rebuild by SC397

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Steve_P View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Steve_P Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/03/2021 at 5:39pm
I have never seen a lifter with a parkerized face.  I have a few NOS AMC lifters from the 1970s and the face that touches the cam is shiny metal, like every lifter I've ever seen.  In any event, any coating would last minutes once the engine was started.
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SC397 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/04/2021 at 1:52pm
I never have either.  Parkerized cam lobes, yes.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mbwicz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/08/2021 at 6:01am
Rick,
  I have a question on the block prep and prime.  I assume that the deck is masked off, but would everything else on the outside be painted (bellhousing mouting flange, front of engine under timing cover)?  What about the inside of the timing cover (oil side or water side)?
  And when you clean the oil galleys, do you do this dry (just wash the brushes), or do you rinse with solvent or soapy water?  I remember a previous engine I worked on it was so easy to get flash rust on freshly machined surfaces when I rinsed with water.

Thanks,
Mike


Edited by mbwicz - Jul/08/2021 at 6:13am
1970 AMX, one step forward, one step back. Both steps cost time and money.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amcenthusiast Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/08/2021 at 12:05pm
I made a video named "AMC 327 Rambler V8 Hydraulic Lifters" that shows Parkerized vs non-Parkerized lifter lobe faces.... explaining other hydraulic lifter details also, specific to the older Rambler V8 engine.

Currently, the Enginetech L2011 for AMV8 replacement lifter comes with a zInc Parkerized lifter lobe face.

Another thing I like to do is spend a little time using bench grinder wire wheel to de-burr the rough cut teeth on a new replacement cam sprocket...

One note about brazing the cuts on the cam gear is that the torch heat may create slight shrinkage, and make the cam sprocket fit extra tight...trial fit. If to too tight can use a sisal buff wheel on cam snout to make it slip on 'just right' not too tight/not loose


Edited by amcenthusiast - Jul/08/2021 at 12:15pm
443 XRV8 Gremlin YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=2DmFOKRuzUc
XRV8 Race Parts website: http://amcramblermarlin.1colony.com/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/12/2021 at 8:30am
Originally posted by mbwicz mbwicz wrote:

Rick,
  I have a question on the block prep and prime.  I assume that the deck is masked off, but would everything else on the outside be painted (bellhousing mouting flange, front of engine under timing cover)?  What about the inside of the timing cover (oil side or water side)?
  And when you clean the oil galleys, do you do this dry (just wash the brushes), or do you rinse with solvent or soapy water?  I remember a previous engine I worked on it was so easy to get flash rust on freshly machined surfaces when I rinsed with water.

Thanks,
Mike

I don't mask the deck or anything on the block. when I am ready to put the head gaskets on, I wipe it down with brake clean. 
I use wire brushes, brake clean and compressed air to clean the inside when it is back from the machine shop.  I can't use water where I live due to the high humidity.  it would start to rust before I could get it together. Sometimes I coat the bare cast iron with fogging oil if it is going to set a day or two before I can work on it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/13/2021 at 3:08pm
Piston and Rod Installation.
After learning the hard way the first thing I do is lay all of the rings and bearings out and count therm.
Learning the hard way on a different build was like this. After installing #6 piston I counted rings and discovered that I had left out one oil ring... so one at a time I took the pistons all out only to find that the box had one extra ring in it. I may have cussed a little bit after that one.
IMG_4839 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

I always check ring gap even on the ones that don't require filing. I orient the rings on the pistons per the ring instructions. After cleaning the cylinder I coat the top of the bores and the crank journal with Lubriplate 105. 
 IMG_4840 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

After the piston is place and the rod bearing is seated I use a screwdriver to seat the bearing flush with with the connecting rod just like I do with the main bearings.
 IMG_4841 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

After I seat the rod mearing in the rod bearing cap I coat it with Lubriplate and install it to the rod.
Once the rod bolts are torqued, I put a breaker bar on the crank shaft bolt and rotate the crank 10 times per each piston that I put in. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/13/2021 at 3:33pm
Timing Cover Prep.
Here is what I look for in regard to after market timing covers. 
The first thing I do is bench fit the distributor and oil pump with no gasket under the distributor.
Tcover1 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

The oil pump gear and the distributor line up ok in this cover. 
I have had to use 2 distributor gaskets on one of the after market distributors before it wouldn't bind on the oil pump gear. 
This stock dizzy is ok.
Tcover2 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

Then I temporailly mount the timing cover to the block and stab the distributor and oil pump gear. 
Everything seems fine with no binding. If the cover was bad, I wouldn't be able to install the distributor. 
The distributor should not have to be forced to go in to the cover and mesh with the cam gear.
Tcover4 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

I hand lap the gasket surface to get near zero end clearance with the gasket installed.
Tcover6 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

With the oil pump cover installed, the gear should spin easy by and and have very little end play (up and down).
Tcover8 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

After everything fits ok I duct tape the area over the oil pump cavity, sand blast it and spray it with some zinc primer .  I pay particular attention to the are where the coolant and will spray a coat of paint in that area.
IMG_1239 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

The last thing I do is chase all of the threads with a tap - even on a brand new one.
Tcover7 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

It is easy to tell the difference between the original timing covers and the after market ones.
The original ones all had the part number just above the vibration damper oil seal housing.
IMG_4151 by Rick Jones, on Flickr
The original timing covers for both AMC and Buick were made at Dohler Jarvis in Toledo. I saw them hanging in their display case about a hundred years ago.. Well, it was in the early 80's before they tore the building down anyway. AMC used 3 other companies as well. If I had a lot of time to waste, I could probably figure out which ones were made where and what years they were made in. The Dohler Jarvis ones have the "DJ" logo on them. Others were SKRL, CF, CFC, and when cryco took over I think they use a re-boxed after market one because they had no logo at all. I could be wrong on the cryco ones but they weren't as good as the rest.


Edited by SC397 - Jul/19/2021 at 11:30am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amcenthusiast Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/13/2021 at 4:15pm
To maximize cylinder pressure during engine break process, we don't want super lubricants interfering with proper ring seal.

Please read Darton Sleeve's tech page concerning boring honing and engine break in:


See also:

443 XRV8 Gremlin YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=2DmFOKRuzUc
XRV8 Race Parts website: http://amcramblermarlin.1colony.com/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote amcenthusiast Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/13/2021 at 4:26pm
Part of the reason for this is due to our favorite old school engines using fat rings.

-contrasted by new school engines using skinny rings...

-the fat ring is like a snowshoe, spreading out the load upon the cylinder wall

-the skinny ring applies more psi load to the friction interface which enables it to scuff in better with modern super lube engine oil technology
443 XRV8 Gremlin YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=2DmFOKRuzUc
XRV8 Race Parts website: http://amcramblermarlin.1colony.com/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/13/2021 at 4:40pm
For the race engines or any with the skinny rings, I clean the cylinders with Transmission fluid and install the pistons with no lubrication at all.
This entire post is just how I put a bone stock 343 together. 
Your methods and results may vary. LOL!

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