TheAMCForum.com Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > The Garage > AMC V8 Engine Repair and Modifications
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Basic AMC V8 Rebuild by SC397
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Click for TheAMCForum Rules / Click for PDF version of Forum Rules
Your donations help keep this valuable resource free and growing. Thank you.

Basic AMC V8 Rebuild by SC397

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 9>
Author
Message
SC397 View Drop Down
AMC Addicted
AMC Addicted
Avatar

Joined: Apr/30/2009
Location: Michigan
Status: Offline
Points: 4522
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Basic AMC V8 Rebuild by SC397
    Posted: Jun/14/2021 at 5:45pm
I thought that I would post up the entire rebuild to make note of all the details to watch out for when dealing with machine shops etc..  
This AMC engine rebuild number 104 for me and will be a no frills basic rebuild.
The first cool thing that I found that IS cool is the numbers stamped on the block which look to me like 
E 055462 68
IMG_4634 by Rick Jones, on Flickr
So the engine is Kenosha built and was or is in a car that was sold in TN or GA.
IMG_1458 by Rick Jones, on Flickr



Edited by SC397 - Apr/05/2022 at 7:19pm
Back to Top
SC397 View Drop Down
AMC Addicted
AMC Addicted
Avatar

Joined: Apr/30/2009
Location: Michigan
Status: Offline
Points: 4522
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/14/2021 at 5:57pm
Block Prep Before Machining:
This is about the only prep work that I do to stock ones BEFORE I take them in to the machine shop.
Remove all oil galley and all core plugs.
I actually dig all of the rust, sand cast and stop leak out of the water jackets before and after it goes to the machine shop.
IMG_4805 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

I finish drilling the 5/16" main bearing feed holes from the lifter galley to the mains. Most of the blocks are only drilled through half to thre quarters of the way through.  
I bought a 8" long drill bit from McMaster Carr to do the job.
MainFeed by Rick Jones, on Flickr

It may be overkill but I also move the oil slot to the front cam bearing towards the front a little bit with a die grinder. All the after market front bearings have a smaller hole in them compared to the factory original ones and they don't line up with the slot in the block.  Rather than drill the cam bearing holes bigger, I just move the slot over.  
CamFeedSlot by Rick Jones, on Flickr

After I detail the main bearing feed holes, I use a small flapper wheel on a drill and de-burr the block at the cam bearing slots in the block.

Cylinder Head Prep Before Machining:
Regardless if the heads have been on a running engine or not they should all be checked for cracks.
I clean both ends of the cylinder heads at the area where they are prone to cracking as good as I can with a wire brush.
I have my own Magnaflux checker but it will only reveal the obvious bad cracks. 
Even if I can not see any cracks using my checker I have the Machinist check them as well BEFORE he does any machining to them.
The cracks seem to start right behind the head bolt and then propagate away from center in both directions.  
I have had cylinder heads that I could not see a crack until the Machinist checked and then we can see a 1" long crack right behind the head bolt but not any further in either direction.
IMG_4973 by Rick Jones, on Flickr
Pretty easy to see where this one is cracked.
IMG_4975 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

Not all is lost if they are cracked and you really want to use them.  Here is one source that can weld them if needed. They are located in the thumb area of Michigan.
Sperry Welding
112 N Main St Capac, MI 48014
(810) 395-4381
IMG_2597 by Rick Jones, on Flickr




Edited by SC397 - Jul/26/2021 at 8:06pm
Back to Top
SC397 View Drop Down
AMC Addicted
AMC Addicted
Avatar

Joined: Apr/30/2009
Location: Michigan
Status: Offline
Points: 4522
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/15/2021 at 9:10am
Back From The Machine Shop:
The engine had previously been rebuilt with +.040" over size pistons and -0.010"/0.010"over size bearings.
The first issue we found was that they had not bored and honed deep enough into the cylinders so the pistons were actually getting pinched around the skirt at the bottom dead center position. 
The picture was taken after my Machinist corrected the problem.
IMG_4799 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

I realize that this might be the exception but it should be the rule. The better machinists will create a document like this that tells you all of the critical measurements and the clearances.  Once he measured everything he found that a couple of the main bearings had near zero clearance and a couple had only .001" clearance. So a new set of bearings because they vary from brand to brand, and a align hone and he got them to exactly .0015" clearance.  Similar situation with the big end of the rods so they were all rconditioned and will have new bearings. 
IMG_4803 by Rick Jones, on Flickr


Edited by SC397 - Jun/30/2021 at 8:51am
Back to Top
SC397 View Drop Down
AMC Addicted
AMC Addicted
Avatar

Joined: Apr/30/2009
Location: Michigan
Status: Offline
Points: 4522
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/15/2021 at 12:01pm
The first things I do to the block when I get it back from the machine shop is clean the outside of the block with a wire wheel and give it a coat of Zinc primer.
IMG_4804 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

Then I dig the water passages out again and clean all the oil passages with the wire brushes.
I clean out the intake manifold gasket dowel pin holes with a drill as well.  They are usually packed full of RTV.  While I am there I use a punch and make knurls where the rubber gasket seats on the block at the front and rear.  And last, I clean out every taped hole with a tap including all of the pipe threads.
IMG_4806 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

Back to Top
Hogman View Drop Down
AMC Nut
AMC Nut


Joined: Jan/02/2018
Location: Sarnia Ontario
Status: Offline
Points: 365
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Hogman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/15/2021 at 1:08pm
EXCELLENT POSTS SC397, FANTASTIK!!!!!!!! WISH YOU WERE NOT ACROSS THE BORDER!!!!!!!!!!    LOL



ME
Hogman
Back to Top
232jav3sp View Drop Down
AMC Addicted
AMC Addicted
Avatar

Joined: Jan/09/2013
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 2377
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote 232jav3sp Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/15/2021 at 8:52pm
Great info! Glad to be reading through it.
Back to Top
SC397 View Drop Down
AMC Addicted
AMC Addicted
Avatar

Joined: Apr/30/2009
Location: Michigan
Status: Offline
Points: 4522
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/16/2021 at 8:16am
Thanks guys. If a guy was creative enough he could print all of this stuff off and make a manual out of it.
Here is a similar post where I detailed how to rebuild a 360 with 343 pistons:

Back to Top
SC397 View Drop Down
AMC Addicted
AMC Addicted
Avatar

Joined: Apr/30/2009
Location: Michigan
Status: Offline
Points: 4522
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/17/2021 at 8:27pm
Cam Bearings Install:
After a good cleaning inside and out with compressed air I put the cam bearings in.  I check each one with a light to make sure I can see the oil feed hole in the cam bearing through the main bearing feed holes.
IMG_4815 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

About the next thing I do is measure the base circle of the new cam vs a old stock cam and I write the dimensions on the box. And this is where I roughly figure the difference in push rod length that I might need.  In this case the new cam base circle is about 0.030" smaller than the stock one so if nothing else changes I should try to install -0.015" longer push rods to make up the difference.
Also pictured is my cam bearing shaver in case I have a problem with the cam not fitting in the cam bearings.  This is a common problem with Comp cams but this one is a Melling cam so we will see.
IMG_4817 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

I noticed that the oil hole to feed the distributor didn't have a chamfer at the inlet.
IMG_4818 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

Probably overkill but I added the chamber and polished around it so that there is no burr.
IMG_4819 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

I coat the bearing journals with Lubriplate 105 and carefully see if it goes in easily by hand.
IMG_4823 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

Believe it or not it works!  Click on it to see how easy it spins.
IMG_4824 by Rick Jones, on Flickr

Next step is to pull the cam back out and then install all of the core plugs with exception to the cam shaft core plug at the rear of the block.  




Edited by SC397 - Jul/17/2021 at 7:15pm
Back to Top
Hogman View Drop Down
AMC Nut
AMC Nut


Joined: Jan/02/2018
Location: Sarnia Ontario
Status: Offline
Points: 365
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hogman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/17/2021 at 9:50pm
NICE SC, REEEEAL NICE! I LIKE YOUR BEARING CLEARANCE "TOOL" TOO!!!!
ALL Thumbs Up  Thumbs Up  UP AS FAR AS I'M CONCERNED!!!





ME
Hogman
Back to Top
SC397 View Drop Down
AMC Addicted
AMC Addicted
Avatar

Joined: Apr/30/2009
Location: Michigan
Status: Offline
Points: 4522
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote SC397 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/22/2021 at 11:25am
Core Plug Install:
This is the set of oil passage pipe plugs from the engine that I will reuse.  The 2 shorter ones will go behind the timing set in the front of the block.  I like to use the deep 1 1/2" core plugs for the coolant passages and I coat them all with a little RTV.  I leave the core plug at the rear of the cam out until I install the timing set.  I use a normal shallow 2 9/64" diameter one for that and install it with a little RTV as well.
 IMG_4822 by Rick Jones, on Flickr


Edited by SC397 - Jun/30/2021 at 8:55am
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 9>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.03
Copyright ©2001-2019 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.
All content of this site Copyright © 2018 TheAMCForum unless otherwise noted, all rights reserved.
PROBLEMS LOGGING IN or REGISTERING:
If you have problems logging in or registering, then please contact a Moderator or