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What kind of respirator to should I Buy

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tyrodtom View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tyrodtom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/15/2019 at 5:16pm
The way I protect myself when I'm painting is different than from when i'm working with fiberglass.
 
When mixing,  laying, and sanding, fiberglass I use a 3M charcoal mask, Tyvex  suit, gloves,  with rubber bands around my  shirtsleeves to prevent the fibers from getting up my sleeves and on my skin.  That backed up with the most powerful fan I can find,  usually manages to keep me from getting the itches, from those fine fiberglass fibers.    You don't want it on your skin,  and you sure as heck don't want it in your lungs.

I've tried the mask with the outside air supply,  but the lose of mobility you get with that big extra hose is aggravating enough in a paint booth,  that I surely don't want to have to cope with it when I'm doing something as physical as hand sanding,  or using various power tools.
  And if you don't properly take care in where you site the intake for that air supplied mask,  and maintain it's filters,  you're actually no better off that a common charcoal face mask,  with a used up filter.
66 American SW, 66 American 2dr, 82 J10, 70 Hornet, Pound, Va.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amx007 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/15/2019 at 6:02pm
no beard or Ppe  does not work I tried  with vasaline it seemed to deal better but no cigar , in the old days a painter use to put hole in respirator to smoke a square , lol he’s most likely dead by now 
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tyrodtom View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tyrodtom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/15/2019 at 10:05pm
In the decades past I've painted in old paint booths with such a bad air flow  that I actually couldn't see the other end of the booth for the mist still in the booth, after only one coat of paint.
 That was with the old suction feed paint guns,  seem like they were more efficient at polluting the air, than putting paint on the car.

But I've always wore a charcoal mask when I'm painting, and priming.   And at least a paper mask when I'm dry sanding.
I'm always clean shaven,  so the mask seals well on my face.

I'll soon be 72,  and I'm still doing bodywork and painting more or less full time. 

But I've always known the hazards of what I was working with.  A lot of my co-workers never took the time to inform themselves,   It was like if they thought if they didn't know,  it wouldn't hurt them.
Most of them are no longer with us.
 
66 American SW, 66 American 2dr, 82 J10, 70 Hornet, Pound, Va.
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tyrodtom View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tyrodtom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/16/2019 at 9:16am
When I'm sanding fiberglass,  not laying it up,  I wear a 3M paper mask,  the kind with the exhalation valve.  Plus plenty of protection to keep the dust off my skin,  and a powerful fan nearby blowing the dust away.

Don't try to substitute one of the cheap look-a-like mask from Harbor Freight,   the metal around your nose is so weak it won't hold it's shape,  and you won't get a good seal at the top.  You'll fog your glasses from the leakage.

I've tried mask, both paper, and charcoal from other PPE makers,  but I always come back to 3M .
66 American SW, 66 American 2dr, 82 J10, 70 Hornet, Pound, Va.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote First_Gear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/16/2019 at 12:20pm
I have a forced air hood. I like it becuase there are no filters. You just place the motor outside and it blows outside air into an umbilical cord past your face. Also you don't have to shave or have some doohicky strapped to your face. It was a little pricey though. I think I payed like $400 and I bought a cheap one.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JGRANTAMX Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/16/2019 at 2:24pm
I have simple dust masks for light dust use, the 3M type with air valve for heavier dust work and the dual charcoal filters type for spray painting. When I spray paint with the charcoal type I figure it's working as long as I can't smell any of what I am spraying, I believe those are good up to 40 hours of use, I gently blow off any build up on the paper filter that's in front of the charcoal filters before use. I am required to use proper PPE at work for whatever I am doing ear plugs, safety glasses, face shield, dust or chemical respirator, safety harness... I am glad my employers over the years have had to teach safe working conditions and provide PPE I am sure I would have fallen into the group that didn't know better ending up with a shorter life span.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AMXFSTBK390 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/16/2019 at 2:47pm
Last night, the TV series Hawaii Five-0, a world famous graffiti artist was dying from bladder cancer. An autopsy was performed and the coroner said rattle cans of paint contain toluene which caused the bladder cancer. The skin is the largest human organ and through osmosis it can absorb toxins, solvents, pesticides, etc. and breathing in paint fumes just makes it that much more fatal. YIKES!Nuke
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67 Marlin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote 67 Marlin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/17/2019 at 12:15am
For 2K or any other urethane or anything else with isocyanates, and this includes the rattle cans with activated hardeners, no less than a full face mask with organic vapor cartridge. This stuff is so nasty that there's no need to worry about cartridge life - one use only. The chemicals in these activated paints will render the OV cartridge useless when sitting between uses, so no point to try to save them for another day. When I say light duty, I mean one spray, not a whole day. Say 30 minutes. And, don't forget to be protected while mixing prior to painting, lots of people forget to do that and they're getting dosed. Tyvex suit and no skin exposed. If you're painting for a couple hours or longer, then get a supplied air unit. I'm board certified in industrial hygiene and occupational health and this is the same fundamental guidance I provide to auto shops that do spraying, not trying to be an alarmist, and this may sound overkill, but it's not - modern paints are sinister compared to what was used 25 or 50 years ago, and those were bad enough. I'm an ok painter, but excellent at not poisoning myself.

As for fiberglass, full encapsulation with no skin exposed like the man said, and a HEPA level of filter. No one likes scratching, but it's the inhaling that's really hazardous, tiny fibers are hard for the lungs to cough out once inhaled, they get lodged in there, think asbestos.


Edited by 67 Marlin - Mar/17/2019 at 12:17am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote celcius232 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/17/2019 at 10:16am
I have work in the HazMat & Environmental Industry for over 25 years and am a OSHA H&S Supervisor. Engineering controls are the 1st thing to tackle and that means do it all in a well ventilated area--outside if possible. Use a full face respirator with combination organic vapor and P100 particulate cartridges. Suppled air respirator units are even better, but cost a lot more and you are tethered to an air line. Do a fit/seal check (look it up on Utube) on any respirator you plan to buy, I prefer North brand, but not all brands seal on all faces. Sorry guys, no beards with a full face and no mustaches or beards with a half face. A full face protects your eyes and has a 5x higher respiratory protection factor that a half-face (50 v. 10). Also use a good quality Nitrile disposable glove or compatible glove (check NIOSH guide). Fiberglass is a skin irritant and a full Tyvek will keep it off of you and out of you hair, they are cheap so buy a box of 10 or more. Check any chemicals that you are using in the NIOSH pocket guide to see what PPE you should use.   https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/default.html

Disclaimer--do anything at your own risk and educate yourself on the chemicals you are using. Most of them can kill you or will make you sick now or later.

Live long and prosper.
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tyrodtom View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tyrodtom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/17/2019 at 10:51am
One time I was working with epoxy resins on a Kelvar  hood, a very hot summer day.  
Was sanding , was fully protected,  except my Tyvex suit didn't have a hood,   so I was wearing a hat.  I stepped away for a moment and removed my hat for some reason.

After returning to the project and sanding for about 60 seconds, then I remembered to put my hat back on.  The dust that had settled on my sweaty skin and hair when I'd removed the cap was trapped by the hat band.
 In a few hours I developed a  line of little blisters right where my hat band had been on my forehead and around by scalp.
  I learnt from that to keep in touch with the hazards of what I was working with,   and to get hooded Tyvex suits.   Little oversights can have serious consequences.
66 American SW, 66 American 2dr, 82 J10, 70 Hornet, Pound, Va.
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