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steering effort

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tyrodtom View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tyrodtom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/16/2018 at 9:37pm
Not only did the Chrysler system have no feedback,  or at least any that I could feel,  you could turn the wheel faster than the pump could supply fluid to turn the front wheels ,  when you got into that condition the wheel got harder to turn.
Sort of a unpleasant surprise in the middle of a turn.

  I run into that trait on mid 60s big Mopars driving too fast on curvy roads.   I encountered in more than one,  so it wasn't a mechanical fault in just one car.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/16/2018 at 9:53pm
Probably one reason why my aunt totaled my grand parents less than a few weeks old Charger when she was in her late teens.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sonic Silver Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/16/2018 at 10:13pm
Originally posted by tyrodtom tyrodtom wrote:

Not only did the Chrysler system have no feedback,  or at least any that I could feel,  you could turn the wheel faster than the pump could supply fluid to turn the front wheels ,  when you got into that condition the wheel got harder to turn.
Sort of a unpleasant surprise in the middle of a turn.

  I run into that trait on mid 60s big Mopars driving too fast on curvy roads.   I encountered in more than one,  so it wasn't a mechanical fault in just one car.
You should have driven a big Mopar that I once owned. It was a former police car that was driven by a Virginia Highway Patrol Lieutenant. At the time, state employees could bid on state property at the auctions. This man bought his unmarked car for his personal use after he retired.

   So, when I got it, it was a one owner. This was probably mid-1980's. The car was a 2 door 1967 Plymouth Fury I . The Fury I was the cheap, stripper model. It was a 2 door post. The car was black with a blue cloth interior and rubber floor mats instead of carpet. It was the good 440 Magnum engine with the high perf heads and exhaust manifolds. The engine serial code for the engine was the same as was in a GTX that year.

    The only options were a certified speedo, power disc brakes, and an inside trunk release. The steering was manual. It had a 2.76 open rear. The man said he had driven it at 140mph.

   That car was impossible to maneuver in a tight area. It had about 6 turns lock to lock.  You had to experience it to believe it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tyrodtom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/16/2018 at 10:28pm
I never owned a car with power steering until I was about 30. 
Manual steering was what I grew up with,  if I drove a power steering car,  it was someone else's. 

So I was used to having to get you back into the wheel to steer at low speeds.
The 2nd place I worked at 17 had a 2.5 ton truck, manual steering.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sonic Silver Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/16/2018 at 10:37pm
Originally posted by tyrodtom tyrodtom wrote:

I never owned a car with power steering until I was about 30. 
Manual steering was what I grew up with,  if I drove a power steering car,  it was someone else's. 

So I was used to having to get you back into the wheel to steer at low speeds.
The 2nd place I worked at 17 had a 2.5 ton truck, manual steering.
My dad had a 1955 Ford F350 stake bed that he bought new, and kept after he went retired from his building material business in 1963. That was a bear to drive with no power steering. I sold it in about 2000.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tomj Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/16/2018 at 10:52pm
Quote https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrub_radius

Quote They ignore some of the other effects of the SAI vs tire center intersection - whether it's above or below the pavement, how much, how it impact brake steer and more.


off-to-one-side is exactly the same as above-below-ground; what they call "positive" is below ground.  the line shows reaching below the surface. that link is simply a brief definition of scrub angle. it does not claim to be a chassis tuning guide.

can anyone point out incorrect information in the article?



Edited by tomj - Apr/16/2018 at 10:55pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote akimmet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/17/2018 at 11:17am
Originally posted by tyrodtom tyrodtom wrote:

Not only did the Chrysler system have no feedback,  or at least any that I could feel,  you could turn the wheel faster than the pump could supply fluid to turn the front wheels ,  when you got into that condition the wheel got harder to turn.
Sort of a unpleasant surprise in the middle of a turn.

  I run into that trait on mid 60s big Mopars driving too fast on curvy roads.   I encountered in more than one,  so it wasn't a mechanical fault in just one car.


This is the reason why it is better to adjust power steering effort with the t-bar and not with pump pressure.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 6PakBee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/17/2018 at 8:03pm
One thing I've seen criticized repeatedly about the '60's era Mopars are 1) brakes (too touchy) and 2) power steering (no road feel).  I've driven that era a LOT, the compacts, intermediates, and the land barges, and never had a problem with any of them.  But that's just me.  Big smile
The difference between people and AMC's is that they will always be making more people; they won't be making more AMC's

Roger



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