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Stainless steel brake lines

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Chisam View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chisam Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep/26/2019 at 1:03am
I used stainless for the brake and fuel lines for my 69 Ambassador and when completed had no leaks or problems at all. I got rolls of tubing from Fine lines, their tubing is annealed to make it easier to bend and flare. Their site has bends like normal OEM steel and flares like OEM steel. They list a roll of 3/16" S.S. 25 ft for 19.99. I did not have to over tighten any fittings and no leaks from first time bleeding the brakes. Bending and flaring their tubing was no problem. Charlie
1968 AMX 390 4SP
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72SST401 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 72SST401 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep/26/2019 at 4:18pm
To all, thanks for the great info, great benefit of this site.
I should have specified that my car is being restored as a fun driver, not trying nor do I want a perfect/concours vehicle.
Rouge343, thanks for the reference to Fine Lines.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Steve_P Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep/27/2019 at 6:58am
Don't use stainless. They are a PITA to get to seal as said and it's not worth the hassle. You're looking for a solution to a problem that doesn't exist: if you change the brake fluid every 5 yrs, steel lines will last 100+ yrs on a nice weather driver.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote akimmet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep/28/2019 at 10:04am
Originally posted by 72SST401 72SST401 wrote:

To all, thanks for the great info, great benefit of this site.
I should have specified that my car is being restored as a fun driver, not trying nor do I want a perfect/concours vehicle.
Rouge343, thanks for the reference to Fine Lines.

If this is your objective, look into nickle-copper tubing instead. All of the benefits of stainless, plus it is far easier to flare and bend. The only down side is the color, if that bothers you in any way.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 6PakBee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep/28/2019 at 10:05am
Originally posted by Steve_P Steve_P wrote:

Don't use stainless. They are a PITA to get to seal as said and it's not worth the hassle. You're looking for a solution to a problem that doesn't exist: if you change the brake fluid every 5 yrs, steel lines will last 100+ yrs on a nice weather driver.


Stainless steel inverted flares are usually difficult to seal.  I've resorted to using a steel female fitting and with anti-seize on the fitting threads and between the nut and the tube, tighten the bejesus out of them to reform the flare BEFORE trying to install them.  A little clean up from the anti-seize and you're good to go.
Roger Gazur
1969 'B' Scheme SC/Rambler
1970 RWB 4-spd Machine
1970 Sonic Silver auto AMX

All project cars.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote vinny Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep/28/2019 at 11:46am
I don't like dealing with rusted brake lines either so that is why I haven't touched them yet. They've been good for 55 years so far and I did buy a coil of new regular type line a year or two back, so maybe next year for the renewal.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 65fstback Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/25/2020 at 7:53pm
How did you make out with the brake hoses and fittings from speedway I am having the same problem with drop plates on 70 AMX and disc brake conversion kit from American parts depot Thanks Jim
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dave Z Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/26/2020 at 7:14am
Originally posted by 6PakBee 6PakBee wrote:

Originally posted by Steve_P Steve_P wrote:

Don't use stainless. They are a PITA to get to seal as said and it's not worth the hassle. You're looking for a solution to a problem that doesn't exist: if you change the brake fluid every 5 yrs, steel lines will last 100+ yrs on a nice weather driver.


Stainless steel inverted flares are usually difficult to seal.  I've resorted to using a steel female fitting and with anti-seize on the fitting threads and between the nut and the tube, tighten the bejesus out of them to reform the flare BEFORE trying to install them.  A little clean up from the anti-seize and you're good to go.
 Well I'll add my two cents. I've used all the options, they've all got good and bad points. Here in New England there's a lot of salt on the roads for year round drivers to contend with, cars taken off the road for the winter still deal with cosmetic rust unless in heated storage.
  Stainless steel is hard to work with for sure. I personally have a hard time flaring ss with any tool as the dies seem to have a hard time gripping the tube and it can slide back when starting the flare. Sealing the flairs is also a challenge. Stainless has a tendency to gall. This is where the anti-seeze or teflon comes in. 6Pak Bee's advice is worth noting. But once it's in and sealed it will last and look good forever.
 CopperNickle will turn green after a while. Coated steel needs the coating repaired wherever a tool is used on it as well as being scraped during installation. I use liquid electrical tape. What are others using? Plain steel works if you paint it but needs to be touched up like the coated line. Or just let it get patina.
 
Dave Z
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JGRANTAMX Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/26/2020 at 7:43am
 Pre-bent stainless lines come with steel fittings I don't understand the logic there, the answer I received about that is the fittings new are color coded so they use steel for that OE look, it seems to me that's BS unless stainless can't be colored similar to steel? I bought replacement stainless lines also bought stainless fittings they will be changed when the brakes are assembled. There is a flare seat dressing tool that cleans up the lines I bought one to make sure I don't have leaks, stainless is best way to go then no rust inside the lines or pain in the a@# replacing brake fluid.

J
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tomj Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/27/2020 at 11:54pm
Originally posted by JGRANTAMX JGRANTAMX wrote:

 ...then no rust inside the lines or pain in the a@# replacing brake fluid.

There's no way to avoid bleeding brakes. Water in DOT fluid eats wheel cylinders and caliper innards, and that's more of a problem than lines, which if you bleed even every couple years, will last 25 to 50. Annually, probably "forever" (longer than me :-)

Work out a good system for bleeding and it's easy and fast. I use a cup with dip tube in it, stock bleeders, press the pedal with my hand slow release slow. Takes me 45 minutes to do all four wheels. I run at least a pint through total, front and rear. Fluid's cheapest thing of all.  I do mine in the spring, as part of my get-ready-for-heavy-driving-season prep. A good time to look around and head off problems.



Edited by tomj - Jan/27/2020 at 11:56pm
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