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Shop Project

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billd View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Shop Project
    Posted: Oct/22/2015 at 8:44am
This isn't really a specifically good place for this, but seemed the best place since it's auto shop related, includes tools, shop equipment and so on. So, here is what's up with my shop all in one place instead of all over different threads.

A bit of a preface or explanation - and "why the #$% is it taking you so bloody long to get this done?" -
I DO have a job, a full-time job away from home. It's a half hour in, half hour back home, which is a short commute really compared to a lot of folks,  but still that takes 1 hour out of each day.
And then I work 9 (NINE) hour days. So just the drive, work, lunch, breaks, it all means time away is roughly 11 hours from the time I leave to the time I get back. Gotta eat, gotta take care of normal stuff - home maintenance, yard work, taking care of Barbara's pool such as it is, damage from chipmunks and ground hogs, you know - stuff. Daily checking of the critter buckets used to catch chipmunks, lately twice daily checks of the conibear traps, fixing this or that, etc.
So it's not like I'm home all day or have 2 full weekend days every week to do this stuff and mostly it's just me with no help.
It's just what time I have outside of life. It's gone a bit better because I've gotten by on 4 or 5 hours of sleep for the last few months to try to get things done but that's gotta stop soon.

Anyway, the shop project:
The original plan was to be an "empty 2/3 of the shop so a company could come in and level the west section of slab which had settled 1" on the west side" and then when that was done "rip up all the concrete approach and have it totally redone properly with drainage and correct slopes and shape" project.
But anyone who has seen inside my shop knows that even that would be major. And it was. To empty just the west section took 6 of us a Saturday to move things up into the garage, and other things packed tightly into the east part of the shop - meaning nothing would be accessible at all save for the woodworking area upstairs and my rolling tool chest with all the hand tools-  sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers, you know, the basics. Otherwise no access to parts, test equipment, no ability to solder, turn armatures, it was all packed away or stacked high and deep.
In among the plans to get the shop stuff moved out and over, Mom passed away from her cancer.
I knew that was coming, but still you can't ever prepare. So with all that things get set back a few days. With end of summer the outfits that do concrete leveling were getting booked up and the company I was going with had an opening - right in the middle of everything else. My brother and his family were the ones coming to help move things and Scot said nope, we go on as planned, we will be there, Mom would have wanted it, she didn't like to inconvenience people.

So then Barbara suggests "that floor is really crappy, it's a mess, why not get it cleaned up and have someone come in and finish it properly". We talked about that, how the original Behr 1-part epoxy process I had used when the building was first built hadn't worked out all that well, wasn't standing up well, etc.
I start contacting businesses and people that do that sort of work and wow, they are all booked up for weeks in advance and it required the WHOLE SHOP, north to south, east to west, EVERYTHING that touched the floor was to be removed and the floor swept up good, grease and oil removed, and no water on the floor for at least 2 weeks prior to the process.
I get someone lined up after a lot of digging into company histories, reviews, BBB and so on and get that scheduled.

In the meantime, hey, I've been trying for months to figure out how to finally get my shop lighting issues resolved. I'd planned on new lights, but hadn't decided what yet, or how to get it done. The lights couldn't be reached or accessed with the shop full. This was the chance to get that fixed, too. So I decided on and bought the lights.
Hmm, now what? Rent a lift? Rent scaffolding? That's costly - especially since I had only an hour or two each evening after work, and parts of the weekends to do it.
Solution - put ladder in back of truck, position truck under each light in turn. That's a whole lot of up and down a ladder. And since the MH lights used different boxes on the ceiling - to hold the light and to act as the "ceiling box", it meant it wasn't just pull down old, put up new. I also had to swap some boxes or modify what was there to function as a straight closed ceiling box.
Most of that can be seen in the shop lights thread in the forum, pictures and other details.
http://theamcforum.com/forum/shop-lighting_topic73963_page1.html

Got the 3 west lights replaced and up and working, but can't do the east because all the stuff that didn't fit in the garage is in the east part of the shop.
It's just ME, me alone, to move all the rest of the things out of the shop.
Holy#$% where is it going to go? Under the lean-to, tarped, and on the car hauler, tarped. It took DAYS - and more - to get the rest of the things moved out and covered.

Since I work a full-time job, usually 9 hour days plus have a house, yard, wife, and other stuff going on it meant a whole lot of VERY long evenings and nights moving things out. I had shelves over 100" high - I had extended 3 heavy shelving units up. So I wore out my legs on ladders, used my engine hoist, dollies, and so on, whatever means I could think of to get things out.

OK, break is over, gotta pause this for now - will be back to edit, fix, add to, put in photos and so on.
Oh, no, it's not even CLOSE to done, not at all......... nothing is really back in yet. Still can't work on anything.




Edited by billd - Oct/22/2015 at 11:39am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FuzzFace2 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/22/2015 at 10:46am
I was partly in your shoes late last year up to this summer. We put our house up for sale so had to do “staging” first. After going to trucking school most of the day I would come home to load the PODS. For some of the big items I had my sons help but most was me only. I started with my car stuff I did not need to work on the project and some house items. Once the house sold I had to pack up the rest of the house. By this time I was working driving a heating oil truck pulling hose, and yes it was winter! So come home from work to pack the house –oh joy!

Then once we moved it was unpack the PODS (3 of them). Well 1 POD had house items that we hired movers to unpack. For the other PODS I unloaded them and it was “where do I put everything in the new garage”? I also did not want to put too much in there as the garage also needed more lighting and power run to it so did not want to move stuff 2 or more times to do needed work in there. Part way thru the “settle in” I got a driving job down here, up at 3am home maybe as late as 9pm. Add to that we needed to buy a tractor to mow the yard and a shed to keep it and yard tools in as they were NOT going in my garage. Got to say once everything is back in “it’s place” in the new garage it is nice.

If not enough my FIL passed away the morning we were doing final walk thru on the old house and driving south.

It will all get better
Dave ----
TSM = Technical Service Manual

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/22/2015 at 2:57pm
Yeah, you really can relate, for sure!
Slowing the project down were other life events, Barbara's heart procedure yesterday and my having several appointments of my own with various doctors in the continuing quest to find what the $@#% is going on........ maybe.
Anyway here's just a bit more while I have a couple of minutes to add to this -
the lights got finished and I love them. I put the link to that thread in the first post here.
I had the west 3 up and done, then they came in and did the floor finish. I'm really glad we had that done. It weren't cheap by any means, and it's more of an industrial finish than a "garage epoxy" finish, it's the sort used in warehouses, handles forklift traffic and heavy equipment abuse better than epoxy you can buy and apply yourself. It's tricky as heck to apply...... and that leads to another delay. Yeah, they got to the project ok, but we noticed when I got home that Thursday that the surface was very "blotchy" looking and there were some spots where it was more like 80 grit sandpaper. It was tough to even run a broom over and I knew that the peaks of the broadcast material would eventually wear down and become dark, and things wouldn't drag or roll over it well.  So I contacted their VP who said "be there at 9 Friday" and so that meant rearranging work schedule to be there. But the crew's semi-leader looked around and saw right away the problem - and even said he knew what happened, and had a solution  -reapply the top coat without any of the quartz substrate mixed in.
He used a tool and knocked off the high or sharp spots, sort of like sanding a rough board and they proceeded to take care of things. It was a whole lot better after that, but it delayed things by over a day, meaning I wasn't going to be working on the rest of the lighting or finishing the compressed air plumbing.
I had started the air piping 2 or 3 years ago but got stopped as I wasn't able to reach areas I needed to reach with the high shelving in place and they were also in the way to run the pipes as needed. Solution came when the shop had to be emptied out for the other things.
So, level the slab, grind the concrete to knock down the remaining high spots as best as could be done given the severity of the problem, clean out the expansion joints of all dirt and filler I had put in years ago, refinish the floor, finish the lights and finish the compressed air plumbing and the drops for air closer to the north end I'd been waiting at least 2 years to be able to finish. Whew!
The air plumbing took a good week of bits and pieces of evenings and much of what I get out of a weekend.
So here's some photos of the floor, first one is the quartz broadcast - they put sort of an epoxy down that's like a primer but thicker and the quartz is broadcast into that.
Oh, and when I say broadcast, I think they do that from a helicopter or airplane.
I say that because those shelves with the starter and alternator cores - all loaded with quartz sand - in and on all of those starters and alternators, too. I guess things even that high should have been sealed in plastic.
So I spent 2 or 3 more evenings cleaning concrete dust off of everything. No question about where the time was going and why it was taking forever to even think about shelving and cabinets getting in there.
That dust has the atomic qualities of helium - it went clean up the stairs and is also all over everything up there, too - meaning I have another chore this winter before I can use the wood shop - scrub down all the tools and power equipment. I went through a roll of paper towels and a bottle of cleaner, not to mention using my small vac getting rid of that concrete dust on the walls, shelving, pipes and conduit, everything that was left had to be scrubbed down. I went through multiple buckets of mop water cleaning the walls and when I dumped each one there was grit and sand-like material at the bottom. As it was concrete dust, I wore a mask and gloves.
In the one photo you might note where I got clever with a come-along and attached a small chain to the wall up above the stairs and used the come-along to lift the stairs up off the floor so they could go under at least that portion I could raise. Obviously the stairs were bolted to the wall so that part wasn't liftable.











Air compressor back in place. I made a new platform for it so I can more easily drain it and leave a tray under it for catching the water, or when I change the oil in the compressor. 
I tried to get creative with the water fridge - raise it up on a shelf, made space under it. As Barbara said, now I don't have to get down low just to grab a cold water. But, in changing this around I lost the space where the old wood cupboard was that held the air tools, sanders, impacts, etc. so I need to find a place for them now. Great.



I had to raise the horizontal pipe to clear planned cabinets and shelves, but finally got a connection by the door so I don't have to string hose all the way from the compressor through the whole shop to the outside just to air up trailer or car tires.





This cupboard will likely come down and move when I figure out where the heck things are going to go again, but you can see the long run of pipe I had to get in place - and I assembled all of it then put it up to avoid soldering next to the walls.



Here's some of what runs west to supply work area on the west side. Fun getting around things.
The shelves you see started there - I plan on taking a 3rd end piece, cutting it to make 2 36" tall sections and welding that on top of the standard 72" ends and getting taller shelves that way. Yeah, I'll add a couple of braces and likely a plate inside, but it should work out pretty well.
Those shelves will hold the blower motor cores and parts and the wiper motor cores and parts inside plastic bins with lids.



I had a Raid bug spray shelf unit in here before, plan on putting up wall-mounted shelves that I can adjust and run from front to back, leaving room for getting in to the shelves and to hang the brooms, mop, etc. 
What else do you do with the space under the stairs landing in your shop? Turn it into sort of a closet, I guess.



No, I don't normally hang network equipment from the wires but I took down a long yucky shelf where it had set, along with other junk and plan on doing something a lot better and stronger. Here is where one bench may go back in place and where I put the other air drop/connection.

I need to also run a welder outlet here near the electric panel. Plan on a 30 amp circuit and 30 amp 220 outlet. I'll leave the other 50 amp 220 for the oven and stick welder if I need to use it out here. The oven I don't want to put back in this corner but will be limited by the length of the extension cord I have that I can run the oven on. At least I should be able to locate it out of that corner and away from the overhead door.



Just another view - you can see that's between 30 and 35 feet of pipe on the west side just to get to where I wanted the other air connection. That's a whole lot of copper pipe in here now - there's 30' of copper pipe spanning the south wall to get to these runs.



So that's pretty much where things are now - nothing back in place, still need to run welder outlet and redo shelving, still WAITING on the new cabinets to come in, hopefully SOON as I need to get tings back in place here.
When you work all day and there's all these little things to do, cleaning, plumbing, electric, etc. it takes days just to do what you hoped would take hours because you get 1 hour here and there in the evenings.
Geesh, I can't wait for retirement!

More as time permits........ gotta run again for now.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lucas660 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/22/2015 at 8:58pm
If it makes you feel any better, I finished building my dream workshop this year, and broke up with the missus about 3 weeks after I had finished. Now I have no workshop just a storage unit filled from floor to ceiling with my tools and machinery and household goods. In a way I needed a break anyway, and it makes me think about different ways of doing things, like parking 50/50 on the curb to change my oil!!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/23/2015 at 8:15am
Been there, too - back in the later 1980s. It does make you rethink things. I've started over more times than I care to recall, but each time it seemed that what I built upon the new start ended up being at least as good, if not better, in the end given time. Every step, every event, it's like a ladder and it's up to us to make it the next step up, or a step backward. HAHA, easy to say, not that easy to do when you are in the middle of it.

I'm lucky in a big way with the shop - I have Barbara's support for the most part. Oh, if I proposed something crazy and spent some crazy amount that there just weren't provisions for or a way to cover at some point I'd be working in some rundown doghouse and sleeping under the stars but if there's a plan, if it can be shown that there's a way to cover things, she's there with ideas and suggestions. She's the one that suggested that the floor looked like #$% and it needed to be made safer, easier to clean and to find things. She knows with the ADD and all, if it's not easy to keep clean, or things aren't easily found, or more easily put away, how things end up (but there's other parts she still doesn't get or understand, or maybe it bothers her and she'd rather not, she just puts up with it. What a saint)

Anywho - last night was spent putting up the supports or brackets or whatever you want to call the vertical pieces for the shelves under the landing of the stairs. These are strong beasts meant to carry a heavy load so the upright parts are wider than the typical shelving for the home. So - I had to put in a second 2x4 next to the one that formed part of the opening to that area because the bracket was nearly as wide as the 2x4 stud or upright and I didn't want to chance it. It also allowed for that upright to be more inside that area and not just right out at the edge. I "glued and screwed" it to the stud.  It ain't going anywhere. I then put the 3 brackets or uprights in place with long screws into the studs under the stair landing. Need to figure out what's going there before I actually put the supports into the brackets and space them accordingly.

On the electric side of things......... I had forgotten that when the shop building was wired that I told the electrician originally I wanted an oven outlet there. So he put in a standard MODERN oven outlet.
Uh, but my oven is from the 1980s and matched the pre-1996 code or standard and uses a NEMA 10-50, just like my old welder!
I showed him MY oven cord and said - oh, since it's 50 amps want to use the welder, too - show showed him my welder cord, which by the way IS original to the box, and showed him how the connectors were the same physically and he changed the oulet to match.

OK, this is where it gets sticky and I don't think I'd have gone his direction myself -  the welder cord uses no neutral, the outer prongs are the 2 110 legs while the middle straight prong is ground. old stick welders have no need for 110, but should have a ground.
On the oven the outer two are 110 while the middle is NEUTRAL because the oven uses both 220 and 110 - clock, lights, etc. use the 110. So they use 1 leg of the 220 with the neutral to get the 110v for the light and so on.
Yeah, they'll use the same outlet fine. But this is the part that sort of bugged me -
He wired the middle prong to ground - fine for the welder but it meant that the oven which needed a 125/220 was using the middle prong which was connected to the ground bus in the box for neutral, making the ground circuit out there have some potential instead of being pure true ground with no potential at all.
The oven worked, even the 110 parts worked fine because they found neutral through the ground since back at the house where the power is sourced the ground and neutral are bonded in the box.
I guess it was ok, heck it worked great for years, and unless there's a problem elsewhere it wouldn't cause problems....... but I found that wire he used from the outlet into the box for ground wasn't tight in the bus, either. I could have easily, and did, get another half turn on the clamping screw. I'm running that 3rd middle wire to the neutral. That way ground is still always ground with no potential and as the earlier codes assumed, the chances of a fault in a device with such very large wires, etc. are very slim so it was fine to rig an oven with no ground at all.
OK, new welders, MIG, for example, have very low current draw on the 220 units. Rated at something like 20 amps for a MIG 190. But they equip them with a 50 amp plug end -
a NEMA 60-50!
A 6-30 would easily do as a welder pulling a max of 20 amps at full load would run nicely on a 30 amp circuit but I assume it's because they assume most production shops will not be wired with 6-30 outlets but are more likely to have 6-50 so the circuit would handle larger welders up to 50 amp. So a 220 welder that only draws a max of 20 amps and that could live easily on a 30 amp circuit has a plug or cord for a 50 amp circuit.
My solution - get that other outlet fixed up nicer for the oven - a 50 amp 125/220 and put up a dedicated welder outlet with a NEMA 6-30 outlet, 30 amp 220 breaker in the box, bingo.
Yeah, but I said the welder has a 6-50 cord/plug. How will I plug a 6-50 plug on a MIG into a 6-30 welder outlet?
Solution - extension cord with a receptacle on one end for the welder's 6-50 plug and a plug on the other end to go into the new 6-30 outlet.
And the neat thing about welder wiring IF you do it as a dedicated welder circuit, the code allows you to undersize the wiring due to duty cycle and type of use. I won't have to use huge costly wire. 12 will easily supply a MIG
I happened to have brought some heavy cord and wire with me when I sold off stuff at the farm. I had a huge extension cord I used with a 220v electric auger I build and have cut the length down on that and am adding the proper ends.
I HOPE to have the welder functional by the end of the night, meaning both outlets wired - the original oven/stick welder outlet rewired and the new dedicated 30 amp welder outlet added and wired properly, and the extension cord all finished up.
Then I can make my shelving units taller using steel and not wood like I did with the others.
One of the original heavy racks/shelves will go under the lean-to along the outer shop wall to hold things I don't NEED to keep inside, the transfer cases, transmissions, etc., which could sit out there since they'd stay dry anyway, under roof, just not climate controlled.

The bad - the new storage I bought, cabinets, cupboards, etc - TWO BLOODY WEEKS I gotta wait.
That's going to set things back a bit there, but on the other hand, as long as it's going to take to get other things back in, maybe it won't be all that bad. There's no way now I can get back in and all setup by mid-November anyway. It just ain't gonna happen, unfortunately.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/02/2015 at 11:58am
Finally a little more progress, at least enough to "talk about". And since Barbara's heart procedure, she's been feeling a whole lot better and helped me with a couple of things. And her advice has been priceless.
She was really happy to see I was NOT putting the oven back in the corner by the breaker panel and other electric, network, etc. She asked what I intended and I said I'd love to put it on wheels and keep it under the stairs when not in use, or at least someplace out of the way but because the only outlet that could handle it was next to the breaker box I'd have to roll it back at least to within 10 feet of that outlet to use it (what a pain) as there wasn't any outlet otherwise. She asked what it would take to put one by the stairs - I laughed and said "a whole lot of money - that much copper and the conduit won't be cheap at all". She said I needed to try to save and get that done.
I got one of the new shelf "racks" up and assembled and she asked what I was going to put there - I told her wiper motors, other to be determined. She crawled into the garage addition where the wipers had been stashed by my brother and his family and we got those dug out and put on shelves. Wow, the first items are back in the shop and put away! Too bad I either don't know where some of the other things are, or some things I do know the location of are waaaay back to where we can't get to them without a whole lot of digging and time, and untarping everything.

I had built wood extensions for my other shelving units or racks as the 72" height of normal shelving is just too short and restrictive, so I added about 30" to the top of each. Clumsy, ugly and not adjustable but it helped a LOT since I have limited perimeter and floor space but have 15' ceilings. And since my plan was to utilize at least 1 of the original heavy units under the lean-to to hold transfer cases and other items that needed shelter but not climate control and it was being replaced by new, the wood extension wouldn't work on the new units. The originals I have are no longer made or sold.
Plan was to take 1 of the 3 grey units for under the lean-to, use 1 back in the SW corner it came from, and use the 3rd for parts to extend 1 of them upward.
I took one of the end pieces, cut it in half horizontally, and welded each half to the top of 2 other ends, extending them up from 72" tall to 108" tall. since the grey ones had a brace exactly at the 36" spot where I wanted to cut I had to slice that brace out, make the cut to the end, put the brace back on one of halves, but the other half wouldn't need it once it was welded to the top of one of the other end pieces.
I did the same for one of the new shelving units, the 17" deep unit. I bought 3 uprights, cut one horizontally at 36" and welded it to the top of the other two uprights, extending it from 72" tall to 108" tall. After cutting the one upright I had to brace the new top end of that upright since the brace stayed with the other half.
The other larger units already had uprights or ends available in 96" tall so I just went that route with those 24" deep units.

Why not save a ton of time and just put everything back in where it came from?
One reason was that some of what came out didn't really have a place, it was just sort of in there. And it was impossible to find things, it was easy to trip over things just laying without a place to put them, so I can do it better - since before it was just bring in whatever shelves I could find to salvage or were on sale, or whatever. A mis-matched hodge-podge of stuff stuffed in with no real plan, and a whole lot of wasted space.
Plus - I had to make more space available for my ultimate goal and plan - getting set up for real shop work in about 16 months.   I had agreed to buy out the shop equipment of a friend who used to do performance engine work but who has a heart issue, and of course, isn't getting younger, and he can't do the heavy work. He is concentrating on his performance ignition systems, magnetos and so on, which is really does better than anyone else. I had last spring agreed to buy Art's equipment and it's time to follow-through. I took Friday off from work and picked up the first truck load. Not a lot in quantity, but it had the truck sitting down just a bit and it road like a Lincoln Town Car on the way home. He's got nice stuff that's been extremely well cared for. Even his older stuff usually looks like brand new. He even mops his shop floor and every year touched up the paint on the floor...... It's always nicely swept and his benches neat and clean. He knows were everything is.

Anyway, here's the progress, and the first of the equipment - more to come as I get money to pay him.

Two of the uprights or ends, from my original shelving - 72" tall.



One of the uprights cut in half with the brace already relocated and welded back into place. This will be the top of the end so it really needed this brace.



Here it's been welded to the top of a full upright. Don't look TOO close, my welding isn't pretty, been a while and MIG is different.... and the stock is thin.




The uprights with the extensions standing roughly where they would end up.




NEW shelving I also extended using the same method. Wiper motors, etc. will go here.



These are new shelves that will replace the 24 deep by 48" wide x 72" tall gray ones I had extended using lumber a while back.
These are 96" tall so I doubt I'll extend them, at least for now.




The wood cupboard will likely "go" and be replaced by some sort of matching steel cupboard.




Barbara dug out the wiper motors and carried them down to the shop for me - blower motors will go here and when I get deep enough into the garage where I can get them dug out this is likely where the bins that hold starters and alternators to be restored for others will be kept so they will be orderly, clean, numbered, etc. I do that now but they are under the bench and not as accessibly or easy to organize in any sort of order. These tubs fit perfectly on these shelves.



There will be shelves here under the stairs landing, adjustable to save space.



This ladder will likely move and the oven will hopefully be put here, at least stowed here and moved to the outlet on the other side of the shop until I get the outlet wired in then it will likely stay in this area.



Not now, not this round, but hopefully by spring, these shelves on the wall will come down and that will be redone, too. It's a mix of 3 different shelve installed at 3 different times and done using scraps of this and that.



OK, now for the "new equipment" I need to make space for -


This stuff goes with the above - some brand new like a new 4-jaw chuck and many other new/never been used things.








Some of these are new, never been cut.



And finally -





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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote pit crew Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/02/2015 at 12:34pm
Don't know there Bill. We just may have to hire you out to organize AMC shops all over the country. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/02/2015 at 1:07pm
HAHA - let's see how this all turns out first!
Man I can't WAIT for the 16 months to pass, finally get back to my roots and training and what I really like.
I always figured if you weren't commenting about it being really bad, it must be ok since you put out quality stuff.
I was really happy that Art waited on me to get a few bucks as we'd talked almost a year ago now and I know he's had others interested in his stuff but he has waited. The money is coming slow and you know what some of that GOOD old equipment is worth to anyone who appreciates it and knows how to use it. That's a Cadillac valve setup there, and it's in excellent shape with a number of new accessories and stones, including reamers, etc.

I finally got tired of tripping over things, spending 15 minutes looking for something that I really needed to get a job done, but only needed for 1 minute - plus there's a big health reason for keeping things cleaner.
My wife hated it, I hated it, time to finally fix it since everything was already out of the shop.
But I'm running into a whole lot more time and more waiting for some things than I had planned on so we decided I have to get things put together as much as possible to get back to the alternator/starter/wiper restoration and the rest will just have to be done as I get time in between things, but I know Art is also rather anxious to move forward, too - He recently asked "how much of this stuff do you want". LOL - all I can afford if he can wait until I can pay. I said I wasn't taking anything until I could pay for it.
I think next might be the boring bar and Sunnen rod reconditioning equipment.
I need to find a decent stand (on casters of course!) to put the valve grinder on - hopefully with storage below for the accessories and seat tools. We talked the other day and both of us prefer things be on wheels, easier to CLEAN things, and makes it easier to store what's not being used that day.

Hey, pit crew -  if you have any tips or ideas, I'm listening!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pit crew Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/02/2015 at 1:51pm
Originally posted by billd billd wrote:

Hey, pit crew -  if you have any tips or ideas, I'm listening!
Don't look at me. I am at that age where I spend 5 minutes looking for the screwdriver I just had in my hand. LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/02/2015 at 2:15pm
Originally posted by pit crew pit crew wrote:

Originally posted by billd billd wrote:

Hey, pit crew -  if you have any tips or ideas, I'm listening!
Don't look at me. I am at that age where I spend 5 minutes looking for the screwdriver I just had in my hand. LOL


Age? I've always done that. Mom used to call me the absent-minded professor.
One of my favorite bosses, a guy I worked for in the late 70s/early 80s, did towing along with his shop. He got a wrecker call and came into the shop asking us if we'd seen his hat - he'd been looking for it. It was hard but we contained ourselves and all said no. He said are you sure? Nope, sorry, haven't seen it, not sure where you left it.
He walked out and a few seconds later came back in "you horses' #$$&$"
and went out on his call.   Yeah, it had been on his head the whole time. 
By the way, one of the first things I did in my wood shop upstairs - yeah, put a hook for my hat on the wall next to the stairs - and a shelf for my gloves.
As I go toward the stairs to go downstairs, I'm looking right at them as I leave.
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