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Mega HVAC and Cooling

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304-dude View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Mega HVAC and Cooling
    Posted: Oct/21/2018 at 6:10am

I know I will be opening a can of worms here... but I am not going to make this into a theory class nor tell you how you should have done your updates to your car for better cooling.

What this thread is on about, is how to improve on what you got, and best utilise your pick on future upgrades.

Basically... your engine cooling fans do more than just cool the engine, but are limited by radiator size and thermostat setting. You can adjust for a large radiator, but you cannot with one too small. So, what works well in your environment may not do so in other environments.

Back when I was just learning to drive. Ford had introduced the Fox body Mustang Police Interceptor for California. Their biggest point about the car was it was tested to run for hours at 132MPH in the desert with A/C on. Smallish car, v8 and temps in the 100+ degree range. That wass something back then, and is what many may find impossible with a stock pre 80s classic.

So before I get into the nitty gritty of what may not be covered in other threads, or overlooked in installation of replacement components, I will lay it all out and go through each segment of operation.

Here is my latest super duper muchly improved super mega circuit, as it has a greater range of programable time delay settings and uses separate 30A breakers and 30A fuses to allow at least one fan to function when failure occurs.... No other online DIY curcuit has such a function, and ease of trouble shooting sections.

Note... the fuses and breakers are for general setups. Depending on fans used, a substution of a lower or higher amperage can be used. Example, the fans I will be using, have an oem setup with a 45A fuse to the fan control module. Since the fan control module, small fan, and large fan are on one fused circuit, a separate fuse can be used to protect each fan circuit and module if isolating each component as done in my mega circuit. The breakers are to protect wiring from a possible shorted out relay, or a pinched power feed wire.



Since many have there own cooling fan setups, I made a circuit, shown further down, for generic setups, and can be custom wired as needed, depending on how many fans or circuits are needed.

The high speed delay module allows for automatic high speed override, to operate the cooling fans in high speed, with a longer duration than just letting the temp switches control on/off functions. It can keep speed hunting to a minimum, and saves on ware and tare depending on how the delay is set.

Automatic high current run on protection during the high speed fan operation, when the engine is off. The circuit ground trigger is controled by both temp switches working together, along with the delay circuit's ground isolation function,  it's almost impossible for the high speed fan operstion to stay on, if circuit failure happens.

Instead of ramping down from high speed, it stays in high speed until cooling has subsided below the need of fans to be on, if set to a delay of 5 or more minutes. If delay is set low enough like 1 to 2 (or more) minutes, it will ramp down, depending on the heat conditions and engine operation. Having no ramp down saves on wear and tare, but primarily, the higher delay range can allow driving below the over heat condition longer, in order to limp to a pull out or service station. It is safe to set the delay for 30 minutes or longer depending on how you feel the need for running hot in extended time frames. Note: it will effect how long the fans will take to turn off when engine is shut off. Assuming normal temp ranges, the fans should kick off within 10 to 20 minutes. But if a over heat condition or switch or relay sticks, the delay module will allow much longer time frame of fan operation. I suggest a 30 minute delay, as it gives time to still limp and stop in between before the high speed fan delay shuts down and only allows low speed to function.

Below is how to setup the wiring for alarm delay control module. As simple as it is, it can confuse many by the way it operates with multiple ground connections.



Here is a link to a cheaper model that has a trigger input, instead of a delay on / delay off function. To make it act the same, just jumper the two pins below the VCC and Ground block header.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Turn-On-Turn-Off-DC-12V-Contactor-Switch-Module-Relay-Delay-Timing-Timer/202351529063?hash=item2f1d174c67



Below is my original mega circuit to operate A/C and engine cooling.



The PWM controller is used over the internal resistor within the dual speed A/C fan. A note... dual speed fans usually burn out the low speed resistor over time. Could be environmental, or lack of proper design in heat control, to keep thermal expansion from stressing the wire and eventually breaking contact.

If the main fan is single speed only, adding a PWM in series to the fan low speed output on the circuit, will allow dual speed function. When high speed kicks in, the PWM will still function without issues, since the full voltage of high speed will over ride the use of current from the low speed section.

I chose not to switch the PWM off when high speed fan kicks in, because high speed should only rarely kick in, and just puts more ware and tear on it in the long run.

Another note... notice the use of a single 30A fuse. Some may use relays with a single 30A fuse built in. If by chance the delay circuit shorts out and a fan motor or both short out to cause the issue, over 60A will be through wiring, and cause a fire with your 16awg fan control wiring. So, for added protection a single fuse should be considered for operation.

The circuit operates as follows. A/C fan and compressor will operate only if adequate pressure is within the A/C system, by use of a trinary switch. Most kit systems use a binary switch, which only protects 1/2 of the A/C systems operational function.

Don't confuse a switch with a sensor. Many new A/C systems now operate with sensors. Sensors or more costly and larger over that of a switch, and require a control device, like ECU and a fan relay module.

The A/C fan will run when the compressor is in operation or when the compressor is deactivated by pressure becoming too great for the A/C system. Once pressure stabilises the fan will turn off when not required by the A/C system.

My rule of thumb is all switches MUST utilise a relay, even though they do function for completing a circuit for operation. Internally they are not as robust as a relay, and may become faulty sooner than using a relay.

Note: after looking a threads on A/C in cars, I found more newer systems are less problematic. Though after digging into it further, it seems to be how everything is tied together and functioning as one. Thus my design being all encompassing. Now the A/C fan operates in dual purpose mode. It acts as an auxiliary fan to the main cooling fan. So whether or not the A/C system is active, once the main fan is active, the A/C fan will run accordingly to the mode of the main cooling fan. If the main cooling fan is off, the A/C fan will remain active while the A/C clutch is engaged.

Back to the trinary switch... when pressure within the system becomes high, the trinary switch will open, causing the clutch to disengage. Though the power feed from the A/C relay will continue to operate the A/C fan. This will allow the pressure to stabilise by cooling the condenser further while the compressor is at rest.

This is one reason why many old mechanical and single fan setups don't cool well when vehicles are in stand still traffic. Some people setup their single electric fan to just kick in with a temp switch, which may not operate when the A/C system needs it.

Unlike the engine cooling fan, the A/C fan will not turn on independently, unless in high heat condition, via the 210° F temp switch, which will turn off once temp lowers to 190° F.

The thermostat should be left as stock, or no more than 10 degrees higher if engine build requires a hotter operational spec.

For engine cooling, the system has two temperature switches. You can use a trinary switch, but they cost more and only one side fails most of the time. Problem is where to install them.

If your engine is 72 and newer, an in line fitting on the bypass hose will work. For pre 72, a Jeep thermostat housing with two ports will work. Or any 72 on up car thermostat housing with a single port, using a trinary switch.

As an added feature, the high speed delay relay was utilised to keep high speed fan circuit active beyond the time it takes for the temp switch to turn off the circuit.

Now how to cool the condenser, even if you have the world's best or just ok cooling fan in operation while the A/C system is in operation. The answer is mount It about 1/2" away from the radiator, and seal around the parameter in between. This will draw 99% of the air through the condenser, rather than 75% at best. Though you will need to have a sealed off fan shroud at the engine side of the radiator, or obtain a push fan to mount on the front of the condenser.

Condenser size can be as big as the radiator support's opening, as long as it doesn't restrict the flow to the radiator.

Unfortunately AMC has a narrow height of 14". With a surface area limited by 14" height, the only option is to go wider. Though custom lines will be needed, unless your replacing with or installing a custom kit.

Once I fit my aftermarket radiator, I can better determine if is possible to squeeze a 15" height condenser. Aftermarket condensers have about 1.5" of its total height used up by top and bottom mounting flanges and rails.

With about 3/4" width on the condenser, there may be enough room to fit to the radiator side, if not it will need to be in front of the radiator supports.

To allow maxium air flow, mounting will require a wider width over stock, about 30" to 32". So, I guess a 15"x32" can be mounted up front with mods to allow pass through of refrigerant lines, if holes are needed.

Back to the radiator opening... There is so much more room to support a much wider radiator. At least 30" of width in the opening. Unfortunately the way the mounting is done, modification must be done to open up for flow to pass beyond the limitation of stock mounting.

For stock applications the above about bigger is better, is not required. Just many who are finding weather conditions and traffic being difficult on cooling and air, the above info given is more about how to minimise flow loss of air cooling effects, through the system. If you can minimise flow loss, by sealing gaps, or minimising air flow restrictions. Some of what I brought up can be used in making a better choice for your needs.

One easy fix for stock cooling fan cars, is to add an electric helper fan to push air when needed. It can be as simple as using a manual switch to operate.

Will add more... later on.



Edited by 304-dude - Aug/20/2019 at 12:40pm
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/21/2018 at 6:46am
To add...

Thought about installing a nice universal A/C kit, but changed my mind. I chose to make the most of the wide open radiator mounting area on a big body AMC car.

As for the condenser... I like the 93 - 97 Nissan Ultima condenser, as it has proper port locations. But it uses block ports with M12 and M8 orfice, for the fittings. It will require brazing the proper #8 and #6 fittings respectively or use of block fitting adapters shown below.

The Ultima condenser's width is about 28" wide with about 29" between mounting holes on the ears. You will need to add slotted metal tabs to the lower radiator support, either by welding or use of fasteners. They will be used for lower stays to align and hold at the bottom.

The mounting tabs have rubberised cushioned bushings to mount against a flat surface. They face forward, so use of 90° angle channel, that are no more than 2" wide, can be fastened to the opening sides to allow the tabs to secure on to.

It's height is just under 14", so it should fit nicely with the benefit of added surface area at its width, for better R134a cooling control.

They run about $39.00 with a lifetime warranty when they go on special.

I will not be using it because of it limiting my design requirements, of restricting flow by unequal port / tube sizes.

The block lines run about $13.00 to $19.00, so they will negate some savings when compared to universal kits. Though the 14" kits are smaller in width, and not anywhere close to the width of a OEM aftermarket replacement from Nissan.

I assume after looking over many years of model changes, wider condensers have been used more widely across the board on most makes. So the old 24" wide standard is no longer for most all mid-sized cars and SUVs.

I will try to utilise what few factory O-ring fittings that are left from my old hoses to help with modifying the connections at the hard lines and new barrier hoses.

The main reason why I hope to use the choice of components is that everything can be simplified in for and function, being built around modern standards.

Edited by 304-dude - Jul/21/2019 at 12:15pm
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/21/2018 at 9:26am
Since I will be utilising my original Evap unit, I upgraded by replacing the original expansion valve with a R134a complaint one. Unfortunately I have no part number to share, as the part was purchased some time ago.

Here is a link to what I think will be a replacement for our expansion valves.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/NOS-EXPANSION-VALVE-R12-R134a-COMPATIBLE-for-UNIVERSAL-APPLICATION-904-266/201916718608?hash=item2f032c9e10:g:KQkAAOSwCmNZvF37



Since my line to the evaporator is nice I hope to utilise it as well.

I will clean up the #8 and #10 male insert O-rings with new green replacements. For the connections.

As for the service valve at the dryer output fitting, I have removed the two valves inside it, so it is now a joiner fitting to allow for a stock look without restricting flow. The valve internals get crusty and restrict the passage over time with so many services through the years.

Here are a few photos of the valve...





Because I want to utilise the best system built around O-ring, my A/C component replacement choices are from 1997 to 2002. Which narrows the search down to a manageable criteria. Though the line / hoses can be in a wider range of years.

So, I looked at the best over all A/C setups and compared them on basic function and flow path. Only a few systems for domestic cars built before 2008 that fit what I have seen as a standard now. So what I am using is now dictated by easily sourced components that fit today's standards and yet able to fit into older cars.

Most any replacement dryer will work, just placement and connection types are the issue with utilising it. My choice by the lack of obtaining proper info in the beginning was thwarted by expecting to use a pressure switch at the dryer, when the dryer ports restrict flow and can vary the pressure reading from that at the discharge port.

Thus a non-restrictive dryer... https://www.ebay.com/itm/A-C-Receiver-Drier-UAC-RD-10002C-fits-93-99-VW-Jetta-2-0L-L4/171867092543?fits=Model%3AJetta&epid=1747478750&hash=item280413b63f



For reference, here is how it mounts, with its two mounting studs pointing up.





Because of the need to swap out smaller diameter hose from the Elantra line (listed further down), to change out the fittings between the two other perssure lines, and to simplify connection to the drier, the VW presure line HA11354C (given in the link below) to the drier will work, once the tube end is replaced with the block end from the loose block fitting removed from the smaller diamter line.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-A-C-Discharge-Hose-Line-1HM820721-Fits-VW-Jetta-Cabrio-Golf-HA-11354C/173815007726?epid=227896372&hash=item28782e89ee



For those who need a pressure line switch with pigtail.

NOTE: FOR THE VW SWITCH, PINS 1 & 2 ARE TO CONTROL CLUTCH, AND PINS 3 & 4 ARE TO CONTROL A/C FAN

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Air-Conditioning-Pressure-Switch-Sensor-Plug-For-VW-Passat-B5-AUDI-A4-A6-A8-S4/263628194698?hash=item3d6177038a



The dryer mounted switch shown below, is bigger and uses the same connector shown above, and seems to be less prone to leak or become faulty. Just look for a 1999 Audi TT pressure sensor. Most have it incorrectly named. Since 2000 VW / Audi updated many cars to a smaller type of switch which was troublesome for 2000 to 2005 cars. Eventually in 2006, phasing in the 3 pin sensor instead of the pressure switch, for computer controlled a/c and cooling.



The dryer mounts upside down, so that liquid is more readily available with limited effects by gasses. The only issue is making a plate for it to mount to, and it's placement. Though a universal canister mount can be used to mount along the side.

The more problematic issue is that the fittings needed to connect with, are not widely used in domestic cars, let alone the Japanese cars. Mazda was very close but not proper, as to use male insert O-ring instead of male O-ring. The issue is remedied by custom lines with proper fittings.

Though having a #8 input port allows full unrestricted flow from compressor to the internals of the dryer. Which keeps pressure isolation from effecting switch operation.

Now you can use any dryer you like that you can fit within your system. I just chose the latest one from my selected year range that has a switch port and mounts in small places.

Yes, the switch port on the dryer is another main reason. I just don't like the switch ports part of the lines, plus it's switch has a great history of reliable use. Only the latest sensors out perform reliability.

Plus the connector, uses a stainless steel wire clip for ease of removal. Hold down tab breakage from years of use and maintenance, will never happen.

Fans, I will be using VW / Audi fans. One issue that is resolved by using my mega fan relay controller circuit, is to remove the fan controller module on the main fan, and wire the two fans directly. From what I gather, the controller has a seal issue with the case, that allows moisture to burn out the fans and controller. Though this issue is with the older models, and I am not sure if the issue is corrected, as the fans I plan on using are from 2015.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Radiator-Cooling-Dual-Fan-For-AUDI-A3-VW-JETTA-CC-GTI-EOS-BEETLE-1-8L-1-9L-2-0L/202171568933?hash=item2f125d5325



Here is its connector... https://www.ebay.com/itm/Pigtail-Plug-Connector-for-Cooling-Fan-Module-sensor-Audi-Volkswagen-1J0906234/322240480741?epid=22009888169&hash=item4b070785e5



Here is the radiator I plan on using. It is the same for most all MOPAR big bodies just there are differences with mounting plates depending on year and model. As described, I will cut about 1" from each radiator mounting flange just behind the square nut.

https://www.championradiators.com/Dodge-Polara-American-Eagle-radiator-1966-1970

Here is the condenser I plan on installing, and may have to cut to fit it in. We are talking 1/2" of room that is questionable because of the upper and lower radiator support pinch at the ends.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/A-C-Condenser-APDI-7013002-fits-98-00-Subaru-Forester-2-5L-H4/273071242751?fits=Model:Forester&epid=1222892118&hash=item3f94507dff



Here are the two A/C lines I will be using to connect to my Sanden compressor.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Universal-Air-Conditioner-HA11270C-Discharge-Line/192674917204?epid=218856586&hash=item2cdc51eb54



This one will require the compressor peanut end to be reperposed to swap to the other end of the line above, since the Denso block fitting will not fit the condenser block fitting.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/A-C-Refrigerant-Discharge-Hose-Discharge-Line-fits-09-12-Hyundai-Elantra-2-0L-L4/332675010944?epid=1240613384&hash=item4d74f9d180




Edited by 304-dude - Jul/21/2019 at 12:42pm
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jpnjim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/21/2018 at 9:58am
Thanks for posting this info up 304dude!

New diagram is perfect and easy to follow even for me! LOL

Thank you for making it even better!

Originally posted by Original Post By jpnjim Original Post By jpnjim wrote:

Your diagram is a little tough to follow though,
I'm sure it is 100% electrically correct (I'd expect nothing less Clap )

but it's not compartmentalized (for lack of a better word),
and that makes it tough to follow.

Putting the battery on one side of the drawing,
and the devices being driven on the other 
and all the do-hickies in the middle that allow the battery to do it's job would make it easier to follow.

I think this might be one of the times where being really smart (as I suspect you are) 
actually makes it harder to get a message out.

If I'm out of line with this let me know and this post will go away Smile

Compartmentalizing a drawing makes it easier to understand because you can look at one section at a time,
read it, understand it, and then move down the drawing taking the next section in to understand how that effects operation.

Really smart people with greater abilities to concentrate and remember can take it in from any angle, juggle the info in their head in any order presented and digest how each new item changes the whole diagram.

^thats not me LOL




Edited by jpnjim - Nov/04/2018 at 9:09am
71 Javelin AMX P-code Go pac 360/4spd/3.91's
was Green/green now T/A red w/blk leather

88,89&98 Jeeps
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/21/2018 at 10:12am
Originally posted by jpnjim jpnjim wrote:

Thanks for posting this info up 304dude!

Your diagram is a little tough to follow though,
I'm sure it is 100% electrically correct (I'd expect nothing less Clap )

but it's not compartmentalized (for lack of a better word),
and that makes it tough to follow.

Putting the battery on one side of the drawing,
and the devices being driven on the other 
and all the do-hickies in the middle that allow the battery to do it's job would make it easier to follow.

I think this might be one of the times where being really smart (as I suspect you are) 
actually makes it harder to get a message out.

If I'm out of line with this let me know and this post will go away Smile

Compartmentalizing a drawing makes it easier to understand because you can look at one section at a time,
read it, understand it, and then move down the drawing taking the next section in to understand how that effects operation.

Really smart people with greater abilities to concentrate and remember can take it in from any angle, juggle the info in their head in any order presented and digest how each new item changes the whole diagram.

^thats not me LOL



Ah, yes I understand... After looking at my circuit I realised a few more minor details, but they will be corrected when I redo the layout. For the most part it is to visualise some of my wording.

I will reorder for clarification. After all the relays will be done  near the battery, and having them strewn about is difficult to see where they fit in the scheme of things,

I guess it's from years of multi layered circuit board work. Nothing is compartmentalised. It would drive you and others like you mad. 

I should have what will be much easier to read and understand schematic tomorrow.  
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jpnjim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/21/2018 at 10:31am
Originally posted by 304-dude 304-dude wrote:

 
Ah, yes I understand... After looking at my circuit I realised a few more minor details, but they will be corrected when I redo the layout. For the most part it is to visualise some of my wording.

I will reorder for clarification. After all the relays will be done  near the battery, and having them strewn about is difficult to see where they fit in the scheme of things,

I guess it's from years of multi layered circuit board work. Nothing is compartmentalised. It would drive you and others like you mad. 

I should have what will be much easier to read and understand schematic tomorrow.  

Thanks for the efforts 304-dude!

Yeah I've tried to follow circuit trails on boards before and the toughest part (other than squinting for 20 minutes at a time) is remembering what each connection does and apply that info to the next part of the board..

It's good mental exercize,
but my brain gets winded pretty easy these days. LOL
71 Javelin AMX P-code Go pac 360/4spd/3.91's
was Green/green now T/A red w/blk leather

88,89&98 Jeeps
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/21/2018 at 11:09am
Originally posted by jpnjim jpnjim wrote:


Originally posted by 304-dude 304-dude wrote:

 
Ah, yes I understand... After looking at my circuit I realised a few more minor details, but they will be corrected when I redo the layout. For the most part it is to visualise some of my wording.

I will reorder for clarification. After all the relays will be done  near the battery, and having them strewn about is difficult to see where they fit in the scheme of things,

I guess it's from years of multi layered circuit board work. Nothing is compartmentalised. It would drive you and others like you mad. 

I should have what will be much easier to read and understand schematic tomorrow.  


Thanks for the efforts 304-dude!

Yeah I've tried to follow circuit trails on boards before and the toughest part (other than squinting for 20 minutes at a time) is remembering what each connection does and apply that info to the next part of the board..

It's good mental exercize,
but my brain gets winded pretty easy these days. LOL


Ha! Yep, I do better with my designing, by just making the bloody thing. That probably why the mixing going on with my circuit. I do one section and add another without any particular pattern until I complete.

It's when I have to explain, is that gets me all in a mix. I Rather just say, it just works, trust me.

The circuit is what I will be using... just haven't built the harness yet. I figured my design would be as useful as any, but i have yet to see any circuits that cover all the functions in my requirements for discussion. It's not much to expect, but it seems too spread out and segmented. I would have to search and post a handful of circuits that can be found on line. Just rather put my notes together and be simple. Ha!








71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/22/2018 at 7:54am

Here are some prefit test images with 1/4" square neoprene used as a sealing gasket, and how close the fan shroud assembly fits around the perimeter of the radiator core. They match in width, even though the 440 radiator's specs state 16" width it is flush with the shroud a t 16-9/16". Notice the upper and lower hose has very little clearance between the edge of the fan assembly, yet a band clamp works well without issues in alignment of fit on all sides. I'd say as if they were made for each other, once I trim off excessive lip (1/3" over hang towards the core) to mount for a shroud. You can see it partially on one of the pix, as a stud and part of the over hang peeking through a fan opening at its edge.

 
 
 
 


Edited by 304-dude - Nov/28/2018 at 7:07pm
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/23/2018 at 6:04am
OK, hopefully for the final time, I made my circuit even more simplified, as to read. To me it is very close to the maintenance sheets found within your home appliances, minus the parts replacement numbers and warning info. HA!

Until I have time to rewrite some updates to explain function... I updated the A/C fan function to be a helper fan for cooling. So both A/C and main fans will operate together either in low or high speed function. Though the A/C can can operate in low speed independently under A/C operation when main fan is inactive by temp switch function.

It's more versatile this way. Also, I made the circuit useful for any fan setup. If you have a dual speed fan, just connect the high speed connections only, as if it were a single speed fan. Though it requires a PWM motor speed controller that is capable of 20A.

You may notice each relay is now laid out with each of its own section. If you follow along its connections, you can see how it is integrated, and can be isolated as it's own option.

For example... All you need from my circuit is A/C control... For the most part everything to operate is mostly in its row, before the next relay.

You can remove the delay circuit by swapping wire 87 on the delay relay to the 87 connectiom on trigger relay, and not bother with the additional delay wiring and relay.

I added a diode, it is to simplify the use of one PWM motor control for both fans, so A/C fan operation can be independent under normal engine temperatures.

Edited by 304-dude - Oct/23/2018 at 6:21am
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote CamJam Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/23/2018 at 9:16am
Ah yes… much better!! I had the same puzzlement originally and just assumed it was over my head. Five seconds of glancing at the new diagram and I could easily understand the principle. Well done.

'72 Baja Bronze Javelin SST
'69 Big Bad Orange AMX (2018 Teague Heritage Award winner) SOLD
'70 Opel GT
'07 BMW 335i
'13 Ford Focus ST
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