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Javelin AMX front spolier repair

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bbgjc View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bbgjc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/13/2017 at 8:16am
It's not too big of a deal to repair the fiberglass. Find the closest Corvette group in your area and pick their brains about the best body shop. There you go, fiberglass specialists. Or if you are near any decent sized boating community check the shipyards. Boats hit lots of crap.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote White70JavelinSST Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/13/2017 at 9:54am
If it is in fact made from polyester resin and glass fibers, commonly referred to as fiberglass, it's extremely easy and straight forward to repair. Just do a Youtube search for fiberglass repairs and watch it.
I used to race SCCA Formula Fords back in the day. The coachwork on those cars is made from fiberglass and is extremely thin compared to street car fiberglass. The first few repairs I did I re-enforced things by making them thicker. Then I realized I was adding weight to the car. I quickly learned how to repair the panels with out adding bulk and actually made several of the repairs seamlessly disappear as though it had never been damaged.
My point is you can do it, especially if you can correctly identify what the spoiler is made from.
70 Javelin SST, second owner, purchased 1972
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shannock Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/13/2017 at 11:14am
From what I can see, I don't think it's made of fiberglass.
I think Dude is on the right track.
Here's a picture. There are fibers of some kind.

Tom Davies
Rhode Island

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote target Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/13/2017 at 3:43pm
I've had originals and reproduction. They were fiberglass. Looks like it's been repaired before to me. Just from your picture it looks like tiger hair.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/13/2017 at 6:06pm
Originally posted by target target wrote:

I've had originals and reproduction. They were fiberglass. Looks like it's been repaired before to me. Just from your picture it looks like tiger hair.


The only reason why I mentioned, is a great while back in 2002 or so this was asked on another forum. There may be a short run on early or late lip spoilers made from a composite material very much like what was used in consoles (non ABS) that did not play well with mending. Did not bond to fiberglass very well, and laminated after time. A crack or broken sections can be done , but large sections broken out requires some structural support and a good bonding glue of some sort.

I never offered nor said my way is best, just gave some info on what could be done if repairing on your own. Just like many other replies I have done with such questions.
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Have2SC's Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/13/2017 at 8:57pm
Originally posted by 304-dude 304-dude wrote:

Originally posted by target target wrote:

I've had originals and reproduction. They were fiberglass. Looks like it's been repaired before to me. Just from your picture it looks like tiger hair.


The only reason why I mentioned, is a great while back in 2002 or so this was asked on another forum. There may be a short run on early or late lip spoilers made from a composite material very much like what was used in consoles (non ABS) that did not play well with mending. Did not bond to fiberglass very well, and laminated after time. A crack or broken sections can be done , but large sections broken out requires some structural support and a good bonding glue of some sort.

I never offered nor said my way is best, just gave some info on what could be done if repairing on your own. Just like many other replies I have done with such questions.
I have had a original in my hand and i have seen the repops also and they were fiberglass. Now if they were some composite ones made i would love to see one and that would mean i have learned one more thing about what AMC did or didnt do and that would make me even wiser.  Know what material you have before you doll out advise on how to repair it and if your not sure wait for someone to respond that knows, and then listen, then we all learn something newBig smile.     
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/13/2017 at 9:14pm
Understood... maybe I am the only one that has not seen fiberglass break like that. I admit I do not deal with fiberglass in body work, but have seen a lot of it after accidents. The pix all seem to point to composite material, as the edges are more clean and straight, compared to frayed and or striated.
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hassyfoto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/13/2017 at 10:53pm
There are enough types of plastic repair products available to professional collision repair shops to repair almost every type of plastic. In addition there are numerous repair products for SMC ( Sheet Molded Compounds) similar to fiberglass and fiberglass to repair the part you have. '
As already stated, the first step is to Identify the substrate ( the material the part is made of).  

I have been working in or around auto collision shops all my life and from the photo, I still can't tell what the substrate is!  With that said, it is possible you have a prior repair, with body filler over top of the repair, etc...  ( or a complete improper previous repair).    I would clean the part, strip the paint off and then bevel the edge of the broken area. Since creating a bevel edge is part of the repair process, this action will not hurt anything. In addition, during removal of the paint you encounter body filler or any type of filler, I would remove all of that material as well. Creating a beveled edge will help you in identifying the substrate a little easier.  
Once you clean and bevel the edge a close exam will help to determine if you have evidence of reinforcement strands such as in SMC or fiberglass parts. If not you might have a plastic part ( need to Identify the type if plastic ( Olefin or non-olefin)) to select the products and repair method for such. Most plastic repairs or repairs of plastic parts ( not Fiberglass or SMC) might and in many cases need a backing for reinforcement during a repair. 

Look at 3M auto plastic repair materials
Other companies for professional repairs: ( Lord Fusor, Kent, SEM, etc.)  Most of the professional plastic repair products are a 2-part product already packaged in a a double tube. You may need to buy an applicator gun to use such products. 

Prior to the 90's, plastic repair was not main stream repair in the collision shops. Plastic welders and some plastic repair materials were available in the 80's but nobody knew that you had to identify the type of plastic ( substrate) first to select the correct repair materials ( olefin vs. non-olefin). In the late 90's new products and ID of the type of plastic allowed for a quality repair. Skip a step and most repairs failed. Ask me how I know this so well! 
 
The reason for the history lesson, many plastic repairs made prior to 2000 were improper and failed. Most folks used the wrong materials or tried to repair a structural part (spoiler) with modified or fiberglass stand reinforced body fillers (as mentioned- Tiger hair, gorilla hair, etc). Obviously, body filler(s) of any kind would not have any rigid or structural strength and the repaired part would fail. ( almost before you could bolt the part back on the car, never mind driving down the road at 55 mph.)

Once you determine the substrate, then the repair process type can be determined and the applicable materials obtained.  You can learn a great deal about auto part repair ( of plastics and of SMC/Fiberglass) off of the internet and the 3M website. 


Edited by hassyfoto - Oct/13/2017 at 11:02pm
Murphy's Law:
Any given mechanical job you decide to solve alone will imminently require a third hand, at its most critical moment

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Shannock Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/18/2017 at 6:14pm
Hey Guys, thanks for all the feedback. But onene thing I'm pretty sure of is that the spoiler has not been repaired. I have no reason to doubt that it's not an AMC part. Thought the only markings I could find were "GT". Here's a pic. It's taken from the backside of the spoiler.



That's the center mounting hole.

Here are some more photos from the back.




Tom Davies
Rhode Island

1971 Javelin SST
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