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Topic ClosedCylinder Head Flow Numbers: Factory/Aftermarket

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Steve_P View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Cylinder Head Flow Numbers: Factory/Aftermarket
    Posted: Jul/09/2007 at 1:12am

This will be the thread for flow data on AMC Cylinder Heads.  All data is at 28" H2O unless otherwise noted.

 

This first group of info was posted by Ken Parkman:

 

More testing on the flow bench today

AMC 2.02 valve heads:

Intake:

         291   090   502

.100     71     74     70

.200   127   156   143

.300   179   201   192

.400   209   219   213

.500   217   226   220

.600   222   232   228

.700   228   238   236

Exhaust:

.100     55     56     59

.200   107   112   113

.300   135   141   146

.400   142   145   150

.500   145   149   152

.600   145   150   153

.700   145   151   153

The 291's are 3196291, 1970 51 cc chamber heads, the 090's are 1973 58 cc heads, and the 502's are 3220502 1974 60 cc heads, I have tested an example of all 3 combustion chamber sizes. The 291 and 090 heads have a multi angle valve seat, the 502's are utterly stock. There is no porting on any of these. They were all tested as identical as I could make it - same port, valves, inlet radius plate, flow bench, day, operator, and bench temperature. The correction factor for the bench temperature is a reduction of 1.6%, I couldn't be bothered adding it in.

The shrouding on the 291 heads really hurts the flow, it really surprised me. The later 60 cc chamber heads probably flow the best, I figure a valve job would make up the little difference with the 090 heads.

Interesting stuff, I'm not answering the phone in case they want the flowbench back. Figure I can stall them a few more days.

Can't add anything on the X heads Jeff. Have a small valve set with an X on them, but can see no differences. Have a single 993 head here, it has no X.

Did some valve job work on the 050 casting, performing the conventional hi-performance multi-angle seat on the test port. This seat is extremely similar to that on the 291 head tested. This was cut with stones because my buddy didn't have a cutter for a 30 degree seat. We then cut the next port with his trickest 45 degree seat radius edge custom cutter, makes a magnificent looking seat with no edges between the multi angles. This is the seat in some books as the trickest and best to use. Here are some results:

Test       1            2         3          4           5

.100     70.3     69.1     67.8     61.5     61.5

.200   143.0   138.5   138.5   126.2   125.1

.300   192.1   193.2   194.4   186.5   185.4

.400   212.6   222.4   224.4   220.5   220.5

.500   220.5   224.4   226.4   226.4   228.3

.600   228.3   230.3   234.3   228.3   232.3

.700   236.2   236.2   238.2   236.2   236.2

Test 1: Utterly Stock, as above with an extra digit

Test 2: Multi angle valve job

Test 3: As test 2 except edges of angles lightly radiused

Test 4: 45 degree seat, trick radius cutter, 'tulip' valve

Test 5: Same seat, performance valve, reduced stem, backcut

Both 4 and 5 were on a different port, and I don't have a baseline for this port.

Conclusions:

A 45 degree seat is a real good way to hurt flow below .500 lift. A multi angle valve seat will help flow at mid lifts but hurts a bit at low lift. The trick performance valve did help a bit at high lift, but it hurt at low lift. The valve and seat have almost nothing to do with flow at very high lift.

Big conclusion - a stock setup works friggin good.

A couple of other bits of info - had a big dollar AFR small block Chev, 2.08 valve, ported by an "expert", that came with an almost to good to be true flowsheet. It was too good to be true, I didn't get anything like the same flow. Buyer beware. Had an almost stock TFS 2.02 valve small block Ford on the machine, and it gave shockingly good numbers, nearly the same as the AFR. The 2.08 valve in the AFR did give better low and mid lift flow. Man I love this machine, am I ever learning a lot.

 

 

 

Here is the next set of test data. I went to a 2.05 valve to try to get some low lift flow back with the 45 degree seat. Then I did very minor pocket porting in the 3 different valve/seat combo's to see what that shows. This is all on the 502 head.

Test 1: 2.05" valve with 30 degree backcut, 45 degree seat, nothing else touched

Test 2: Same with minor pocket porting

Test 3: As test 5 yesterday (2.02 valve, 45 seat) with minor pocket porting

Test 4: As test 3 yesterday (2.02 valve, 30 seat) with minor pocket porting

 

              1       2       3      4

.100     68     68     62     77

.200   137   137   127   150

.300   191   197   190   202

.400   221   234   228   232

.500   224   232   232   232

.600   228   236   238   238

.700   232   240   240   242

Conclusions: with a 45 degree seat even a 2.05 valve does not get back the low lift flow of a stock valve when both have good valve jobs. With minor pocket porting a stock valve still works better. With the rest of the port stock max lift flow changes with all of this are almost insignificant. A little pocket porting gives nice gains in the mid lift range.

Big conclusion: AMC must have known something when they designed this port - it works real well!

I've also had a sbc double hump head and a sbd 'J' head up on the machine, neither can touch an AMC - by a bunch!

 

Here are some comparison numbers for sbc and sbd

Lift / AMC 502 / Chev 370 / Dodge 'J'

Intake

.100     70     60     55

.200   143   122   112

.300   192   167   161

.400   213   190   198

.500   220   199   210

.600   228   203   205

.700   236   203

Exhaust

.100     59     40    49

.200   113     80   106

.300   146   114   125

.400   150   128   132

.500   152   135   134

.600   153   143   136

.700   153

Testing tonight has been dissapointing. I've machined the throats, narrowed the guide bosses, and machined the chamber to unshroud the valves, testing each time. For the most part I've gotten nothing in flow increases, and some loss in low lift flow with the 2.02 valves, but the 2.05 valve did show a little gain, and it liked the unshrouding, showing slight low lift improvement, almost up to a stock valve. It also now shows the best flow by a smitch, at 248.

 

Conclusion: Air doesn't know it should flow more with "obvious" port improvements, so it doesn't. The 502 head with a 2.02 valve doesn't need any unshrouding. A stock valve is still pretty hard to beat.

I have seen as much gains in the bowl as I am going to. Now to go looking elsewhere. Maybe some of tonight’s mods may have helped if the rest of the port flowed better.

 

Here's tonight's flow numbers. I'm sticking to one port now because I am running out of time. Tonight I smoothed the cast port surface, up til now it's been completely untouched. This is not polishing, just smoothing the surface. Then I opened the pushrod pinch a bit, sizing the cross sectional area for a 6000 rpm 401, maximizing velocity. I did not enlarge the port, because I am shooting for a certain velocity.

 

Test       1        2       3     4

.100     68     69     69     68

.200   136   142   142   140

.300   198   200   201   201

.400   236   238   246   246

.500   242   240   252   256

.600   242   246   256   258

.700   248   250   260   264

Test 1: Throat machined and valve guide boss narrowed

Test 2: Combustion chamber unshrouded with a 2.4" cutter

Test 3: Cast wall surface smoothed

Test 4: Pushrod pinch sized

Conclusion - the numbers are coming around nicely. This is not radical race porting, this is for a street 401. Once again the AMC is proving to be an excellent design.

Now to go for the details that make or break a port.

 

For a 45 degree seat I bore the throat .200 smaller than the valve diameter. On a 30 degree seat I make the throat .020 or .030 smaller than that.

Intensive testing session tonight, I'm losing the flowbench in the morning. Here is the end result, compared to stock. the head is a 502 large chamber head that started with a 60 cc chamber, and now has a 2.05 1.68 valve combination.

Lift, Intake Stock and Ported, Exhaust Stock and Ported

.100     70     69     59     56

.200   143   141   113   111

.300   192   201   146   172

.400   213   248   150   178

.500   220   260   152   185

.600   228   266   153   190

.700   236   272   153   193

 

I'm real happy with this port, because I did not raise it or make it big. This is sized for max velocity in a 6000 rpm 401 so it should make a great torque curve. This should be an awesome street head.  

The exhaust was flowed without the bellmouthed pipe on the exhaust that is recommended, so the exhaust flow might be a little low, but these are the numbers I've got. It was wild how incredibly small tweaks could HUGE effects at mid lift on the exhaust. Here unshrouding made a big improvement.

Here is my stupidly ported intake and exhaust, I would not run this, this was just an exercise in how far I could push it. If you need flow like this by an Aluminum head.

Lift Intake Exhaust

.100     74     50

.200   146   104

.300   210   154

.400   258   188

.500   289   211

.600   297   226

.700   305   229

This was with a 2.10 1.65 valve combination.

Yep, I flowed the intakes on a head Steve, and on a stock 291 that is exactly what I found, 2-3%. On a max ported head a stock torker hurt the flow to the tune of about 8%, but working on the torker brought it back to about 3%. The air gap on a mild ported head took nearly 14% off the flow, where a R4B was 8% and a stock cast iron was 9.5%. Most of this (except the air gap, and I did baseline a R4B to double check) was a while ago, and was all on the same upper port to try to be consistant. With what I have recently learned I would like to do it again, checking both the upper and lower halves of the dual plane's. We did that to a BBC intake, and found never make any assumptions because the lower half flowed WAY better than the upper half.

 

 

 

 

4/15/2004

Somehow I've ended up with 2 sets of 291 heads here that I am porting for board members. It wasn't my plan to do much porting, because it is too much work for not enough money, but due to a couple of situations here I am. So I thought I would post some flow data during the process if you guys are not tired of it.
 
The first set is for a 360, so I will not be making them that big to keep the velocity good. Here is the completely stock flow test:
 
Lift   Intake   Exhaust  Exhaust with stub
.100     69.1     53.7     53.5
.200   142.6     95.1   101.3
.300   192.5   130.8   143.4
.400   218.4   143.4   161.1
.500   221.3   144.6   167.1
.600   224.6   145.9   169.1
 
These heads had extremely badly pitted seats, and for the exhaust I was using a 1.68 valve. Both of those things will not make a big difference for flow. The intake shows the slightly poorer flow compared to the later heads, but is typical. Notice how much difference the exhaust stub makes. The dog leg really comes to life with the stub, and of course that is the way it is on the engine with headers. I have now learned most of the exhaust flow numbers are done incorrectly (including my own from earlier testing). This is much more representative, and the AMC dog leg really is good.
 
Next test with 11/32 valve guides, hardened exhaust seats cut for a 1.65 valve, and the intakes cut for 2.055 valves. I do have a good Ferrea 2.055 intake, but not the correct exhaust, so I am using a 1.600 Ferrea chev valve. This will have an effect on the exhaust numbers, but it should not be huge.
 
Lift   Intake   Exhaust with stub
.100     65.7     47.4
.200   127.7     94.0
.300   181.0   134.7
.400   212.8   158.6
.500   221.5   170.0
.600   229.1   175.6
.700   235.6   178.5
 
This is with a top notch valve jub, but nothing else. Notice how just a bigger intake with a 45 degree seat is a pretty good way to kill low and mid lift flow. There was not much effect on the exhaust, a little worse low lift and a little better high lift. I'm not bothering with no stub because it is misleading.
 

Next test with the basic work on the mill. I sized the throats correctly for the new valves, did the most minor unshrouding, but that got rid of the machined lip in the combustion chamber a 291 has. Also used the mill to square the port opening and size the pushrod pinch. Just a little bigger, trying to target velocity for about a 6500 rpm max 360. Then I did basic blending of this machine work. On the exhaust I did basic hand porting of the throat. Here are the results:
 
Lift   Intake   Exhaust with stub
.100     67.5     49.7
.200   137.8   107.9
.300   192.7   153.1
.400   236.5   177.9
.500   256.8   220.0
.600   248.0   227.5
.700   257.2   229.8
 
Now we're getting somewhere! I got most of the low lift intake flow back, and the upper lift flow is taking off. The drop above .500 lift tells me I have some more work to do yet, but the improvement are huge. The exhaust is amazing. That was not much work, and fantastic results. The dog leg really is that good, and way ahead of the ported rectangular SS heads with a 1.74 valve. Awesomely good design that dog leg!

 

 

Ken_Parkman on  Mar 29th, 2004, 12:06am wrote:
Ran across an original set of the SS/AMX heads, casting 3188558. Or at least they are supposed to be original, they were supposed to have come off a car that started a conversion to a comp style car, but never got finished. It is supposed to be in a garage somewhere a few hours from here, sometime I will have to go hunting. They look right, but who knows for sure. Seeing as I am a kid with a new toy I put one on the flowbench - my buddy says I would flow the kitchen toaster if I thought I could learn something. If anyone is curious here are the numbers:

Lift/Intake/Exhaust/Exhaust with stub

.100     69.6     57.2     58.2
.200   153.8   100.3   106.9
.300   206.5   129.3   142.2
.400   242.1   146.0   161.4
.500   239.5   151.8   172.0
.600   246.0   159.5   180.9
.700   248.2   167.2   190.5

I have discovered flowing an exhaust without a stub is a mistake, especially on an AMC. The shape of the port without a pipe makes the flow direction wrong and entrains air. The dogleg ports really pick up with a correct stub, much more than this rectangular. Even though the raw data does not show the dogleg to be that much better, add a stub and the dogleg really shines. AMC knew what they were doing with that.

Been doing some more testing on the flow bench with different headers, thought I would post some data.
 
First thing to remember this is a flow test only, it cannot judge cylinder scavenging or how the header works on an engine. There is a lot more to headers than just flow. And if you want a good torque curve use a full length header.
 
First set of tests was using a VERY well ported (if I do say so myself) exhaust on a 291 head with a 1.65" valve. All of these tests are on cylinder #1.
 
Lift   w/stub   #1   #2   #3   #4   #5
.100    50.8    50.5    49.8    50.3    49.5    52.5
.200   111.9   108.5   105.4   107.1    99.9   102.1
.300   166.9   153.7   142.2   147.1   126.4   131.4
.400   206.4   180.2   159.0   167.7   138.5   143.1
.500   232.7   194.4   167.3   178.0   143.9   148.8
.600   247.8   202.9   171.8   184.5   146.7   151.4
.700   255.2   209.0   175.6   189.9   148.6   153.3
 
This set of tests is on a more mildly ported exhaust, still well better than stock, but not as effective as the above head.
 
Lift   w/stub   #1   #2   #3   #4   #5
.100    45.8    46.2    45.7    46.0    45.4    45.5
.200   100.8    97.5    94.5    96.5    91.3    98.8
.300   143.6   135.7   128.4   132.8   120.8   123.7
.400   175.8   161.7   150.5   156.3   136.5   140.0
.500   189.8   171.0   158.0   164.8   143.1   147.8
.600   198.4   176.7   161.8   170.3   146.9   150.6
.700   203.2   179.5   164.3   173.1   147.7   152.4
 
Just to really OD on numbers I did the same set of tests on a unported, but with a very effective valve job, small valve rectangular exhaust port 290 head. This is with a 1.406" valve
 
Lift   w/stub   #1   #2   #3   #4   #5
.100    48.7    48.2    45.8    48.3    45.8    46.6
.200   101.1    98.3    94.8    97.7    92.2    92.8
.300   131.2   126.0   120.7   123.9   115.1   116.2
.400   141.3   134.7   128.6   132.6   122.3   123.3
.500   144.0   138.0   131.7   136.3   125.2   125.6
.600   145.8   139.9   133.1   138.2   126.7   127.7
 
Header #1: 1 7/8 dog leg race header, made from a tube chassis weld up kit, Hedman components.
 Header #2: 1 3/4 dog leg dyno header, actually a Hedman Jeep fenderwell header with the port modified to properly fit the dog leg.
 Header #3: 1 3/4 dog leg Hooker pn 7105. It fits the port reasonably well.
 Header #4: 1 5/8 dog leg Hedman pn 98310. It fits the port absolutely terrible, way smaller than the port exit.
 Header #5: 1 5/8 rectangular Hooker pn 7104. It fits a rectangular port very well, but of course does not match the dog leg head.
 
 
Interesting data, but it is sort of hard to make many conclusions. Here are mine:
 
The better flowing the head the more important the headers are.
 
If you are using a crappy header there is almost no use in porting the exhaust.
 
If you have a small valve head the header really has very little influence on the flow.
 
At the same size the Hookers flow better than the Hedmans, probably because of the nicer looking collector.
 
The non-dog leg 1 5/8 Hooker actually flows better than the badly fitting dog leg 1 5/8 Hedman.
 
The Hedman's are still a great deal at 1/3 the price of the Hookers

 

Edelbrock head flow

Date: Friday, March 12, 2004 10:04 AM
From: Randy Guynn <amx69@swbell.net>

The published air flow on the new Edelbrock heads is now available. From
my understanding it will be May before any heads are released. At any
rate, here are the flow figures.
.100 lift, intake 65 cfm,   exhaust 52  cfm
.200 lift, intake 130 cfm, exhaust 96  cfm
.300 lift, intake 192 cfm, exhaust 127cfm
.400 lift, intake 235 cfm, exhaust 163 cfm
.500 lift, intake 258 cfm, exhaust 182 cfm
.600 lift, intake 260 cfm, exhaust 190 cfm
 


Edited by Steve_P - Jul/09/2007 at 1:23am
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/13/2007 at 8:02am
Just thought I would share My Indy old 401-1 #'s
flowed at 28 inches radius intake .No pipe or stub on the exh
 
list     intake  Exhaust
.100   54.5     60.1
.200   131.5   112.1
.300   196.8   153
.400   252.7   184.8
.500   299.4   211.4
.600   339.9   234.1
.700   360.4   248.7
.800               259.4
.900               266.9
 
I think I picked up the intake #'s a couple of cfm.All I could find was this old flow sheet from 03/04
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/30/2007 at 3:23am

Raw, unported stock heads.

3231475 (and -2) from 1978-1985 used in all AMC V8 360
64ccs
Lift.....Exhaust...Intake
.200 107 142
.300 137 186
.350 143 200
.400 143 204
.450 144 208
.500 N/A 209
.550 N/A 211
.600 N/A 214

3220502 (and -2) from 1974-1977 Used in AMC 360 and 401
59.2ccs
Lift..... Exhaust...Intake
.200 114 144
.300 132 188
.350 137 201
.400 140 204
.450 142 210
.500 144 212
.550 N/A 213
.600 N/A 216

3196291-C Used only in 1970 390 and 71' 401
61cc
Lift.....Exhaust...Intake
.200 101 138
.300 137 185
.350 147 202
.400 152 212
.450 153 212
.500 154 214
.550 155 217
.600 N/A 219

N/A means their was simply too much turbulence to measure accurately.

Edelbrock heads no valve size change ported
Intake 2.02, Exhaust 1.60....11/32 stem, back cut valves
54ccs
Average flow intake 236.6, Max 275CFM
Average flow exhaust 179.1 Max 214CFM
Lift.....Exhaust...Intake
.200 106 134
.300 145 182
.350 163 218
.400 176 244
.450 190 259
.500 200 270
.550 206 274
.600 212 274
.650 214 275
Now with 2.080 Intake valves and a little more exhaust work
Average flow intake 253.5 Max 296CFM
Average flow exhaust 182.1 Max 216CFM
Lift.....Exhaust...Intake
.200 113 143
.300 149 202
.350 167 231
.400 181 254
.450 191 273
.500 201 278
.550 207 280
.600 214 286
.650 216 292
.700 ....  296
 
Finally got a chance to flow my AMC 090 heads this evening.

As some of you know I've been working on these for quite some time.

To date, I have installed hardened exhaust seats and opened up the throat with a piloted cutter to match the seat ID (about .100" larger diameter throat), but have not blended this plunged cut into the bowls yet. The 3 angle valve job is done with a 2.025d intake valve on a 30deg seat and 1.68d exhaust valve on a 45deg seat.

I have opened up the chambers by unshrouding the valves, used a fly cutter to open the radius of the chamber, blended all the machine cuts in by hand grinding, and also tuliped the intake valves for more CC's - alot of hard work to get this done but all of the chambers now measure 64.5cc's.

I have also gasket matched the intake ports and ground down any casting flash out of the intake and exhaust runners.

Here are my Superflow bench results and stock 090 and Edelbrock head numbers for comparison:

Intake (28")
Lift, Edel, S090, My 090's
100, 65, 74, 85
200, 130, 156, 160
300, 192, 201, 210
400, 235, 219, 225
500, 258, 226, 230
600, 260, 232, 238
AVG, 190, 185, 191

My intake numbers are typical for a 30deg valve seat (Edel have 45deg seat). I attribute the improvement over stock at low lift primarily to unshrouding the valves.

Exhaust (25")
Lift, Edel, S090, My 090's
100, 52, 56, 53
200, 96, 112, 103
300, 127, 141, 142
400, 163, 145, 163
500, 182, 149, 169
600, 190, 150, 175
AVG, 135, 126, 134

As you can see, even with the rough edge that currently exists in my exhaust bowls, opening the throats made a big difference over stock at high lift and even keeps up with the stock Edelbrocks up to .400" lift.

I expect to see better numbers overall once I am through blending in my machining and working on the bowls.

I'll post back final numbers when I am finished.
 
PS: I'm not sure how many inches of water vacuum were used to test the Edlebrock or stock heads (I used 28int and 25exh) so this may not be a completely accurate comparison.
___________________________________________
 
Here are my final numbers after blending the machining in the bowls:

Valve Intake
Lift, Edel, S090, My 090's
.100, 65, 74, 90
.200, 130, 156, 157
.300, 192, 201, 202
.400, 235, 219, 220
.500, 258, 226, 236
.600, 260, 232, 241
AVG, 190, 185, 191

Valve Exhaust
Lift, Edel, S090, My 090's
.100, 52, 56, 53
.200, 96, 112, 110,
.300, 127 , 141, 149
.400, 163, 145, 175
.500, 182 , 149, 192
.600, 190, 150, 192
AVG, 135, 126, 145

You might note the improvement after blending relative to my previous numbers.

Also note that although my numbers are up, the exhaust valve quit improving after .500 lift - as did the stock port.

I lost a little mid lift flow on the intake after blending but this could just as well be setup error as the difference is marginal.
 
I did not really change much on the intake from the previous test other than clean up the bowls. The only difference from stock on my intakes are gasket matched ports, deburred runners, and cleaned up bowls.

The slightly lower than stock exh flow at .100 and .200 is probably due to the larger throat, resulting in a minor loss of some low lift velocity, but it sure jumps up after that and did show considerable gains over the previous test after cleaning up the machining.

Note that stock heads don't gain much after .400 lift (only 4cfm exh from .400 - .500). Mine jump 27cfm.

I used a bell-mouthed inlet fairing made from a 1" thick polycarbonate plate on the intake port and various sizes of exhaust stub tubes (1.5", 1.75", 2") . None of these matched up exactly to the ports, though the intake was pretty close, so the numbers should only be used for comparison from one test to the next using the same setup, not actual flow when installed with a matched manifolds. The smaller exh stub tubes resulted in better numbers, for what that's worth.


Edited by 74Bubblefender - Aug/29/2007 at 7:08am
We are just about to forge new AMC V8 crankshafts.. please check here
http://www.bulltear.com/forums/showthread.php?19564
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/07/2008 at 4:27pm
I ported a set of 291 C heads for a fellow several years ago.  Here is what they flowed.  Std Atmosphere, corrected to 28"
 
       Ex       In
.1    57       90 
.2    115   148
.3    147   200
.4    192   241
.5    206   273
.6    210   293
.7    211   300
.8    na     308     
 
No exhaust stub, just a large clay fillet used on both the intake and exhaust.
 
Four valve shapes were tested and it made a differernce.  I did a lot of port velocity mapping and wet flow testing as well.  This compared quite well to a set of Mondello heads I was loaned as a "guide".  The Mondello ports were about 30% epoxy.  With that head as a guide I didnt hit water but I remember cutting into a bolt or a pushrod hole so I didnt away without a little epoxy.
 
John


Edited by nosigma - Jan/07/2008 at 4:35pm
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/16/2008 at 8:03am
My HLR heads flow .306 @ .600 and .323@ .700 I forget what the exhaust flows but I know it is up there.
 That is with 2.1 Manly super duty race valve and reworked combustion chambers.  No epoxy and didn't brake thru the pushrod pinch.
 Davis


Edited by GremlinXman - Apr/16/2008 at 8:03am
72 Gremlin X was 360 Auto ran 12.6 @ 107 now 406 CI Auto 11.035 @ 121
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/01/2009 at 4:03pm
excellent head data Steve. Hard work, well worth it .
Many posts worry too much about what intakes, cams, headers etc to use on their builds and neglect to know what heads they have and how their heads flow first!
Once you know your block its HEADS FIRST! Then match up the support equipment. Heads dictate HP potential.
I have printed out your data and added it to my binder.
Thanks
 
Perry 70 Javelin SST 390, 70 AMX 390, 73 AMX 360, 63 Nova Conv. 283
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/10/2009 at 10:13pm
Here are the numbers for our port job on the Indy Heads
 
28" with clay difuser 2.100 int valve 1.65 exh. 
 
Lift          Int            Exh
.100        65.0          55.2
.200        139.3        112.7
.300        200.3        151.0
.400        249.6        186.0
.500        290.2       208.4                  
.600        312.8       225.0
.700        323.0       238.4
.800        326.0       250.0
 
Thanks,
 
Nick
 
Alfano Performance
4849-76 st
Kenosha, WI. 53142
262-308-1302
71amx@sbcglobal.net
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/19/2009 at 8:59pm
my indy srs flow
                       int            ext
.100              92.87         58.23
.200            164.28       117.90
.300            224.96       172.24
.400            277.65       217.87
.500            315.77       240.87
.600            343.42       260.40
.700            360.37       273.11
.800            365.72       282.27
race heads
 
.100              79.98        54.33
.200             159.95     114.78
.300             227.97     169.56
.400             282.74     215.93
.500             322.40     238.65
.600             340.49     257.45
.700             346.31     270.38
.800             349.18     279.68
srs on my pump gas 427
 
John Garland  Garland Performance
.200             159.95       11
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/08/2010 at 10:16am
If you have flow numbers to share please PM them to a moderator to add to this thread. 
1971 Gremlin 258
1971 Hornet SC/360
1979 AMX 304
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/24/2011 at 8:00am
Courtesy pfordamx:

here are some flow numbers from my ported 291c's with 2.02 intakes and 1.65 exhaust
bare in mind i did not port these.

flowed at 28" h20 76 degrees f 29.55 barometer and 66% humidity

intake radiused inlet guide plate

.100 -   67.90
.200 -   134.64
.300 -   202.57
.400 -   233.91
.500 -   248.10
.600 -   258.40
.700 -   261.52

exhaust used 8" long 2" tube

.100 -   62.70
.200 - 113.21
.300 - 160.59                               numbers generated from JKM dual 600 flow bench
.400 - 202.62
.500 - 230.08
.600 - 241.11
.700 - 248.00
1971 Gremlin 258
1971 Hornet SC/360
1979 AMX 304
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