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Can anyone ID this tool

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billd View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Can anyone ID this tool
    Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 7:06pm
The bottom tool in this picture (the top is Ford, just not sure of the year or what it came with)

The Elgin
EXTRA Jaw 25ยข
 
It's obvious that it's a sort of adjustable "wrench" or pliers, not really a "Crescent wrench" and not really "Vice Grips"
The bottom jaw is plain, the top has angled serrations.

Were many made? Has anyone else seen these?

This one is stamped with a Patent Date of June 8 1897

It works after a bit of cleaning.
This is one of the odd tools I found in my father's numerous stashes of tools and stuff. (some of which he found and gathered over the years, some are old tools from family dating back 100 years.)


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote amcglass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 7:43pm
and you can get an extra jaw for .25 also

Javmanpres

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 7:53pm
Originally posted by amcglass amcglass wrote:

and you can get an extra jaw for .25 also



Here I thought this would be the continuation to the Gizmo, whatcha-ma-call it, doohicky, thinga-mabob.

They almost look like sheep shears to me.
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 8:40pm
I found this - it's called an alligator wrench and yeah, it was made just before the 1900s, patent was applied for in 1896 and it was made by Elgin until 99 then production was taken over by another company, apparently. 
So it's truly over 100 years old and it has been used - by the wear on the jaws..



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 304-dude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 8:55pm
Billd, my grandpa would call water pump pliers, alligator pliers. Though that design has much longer jaw, and built around the crescent wrench.

I figured having both shown, was a bit of a brain teaser on your part... trying to trick us in an odd way.
71 Javelin SST body
390 69 crank, 70 block & heads
NASCAR SB2 rods & pistons
78 Jeep TH400 w/ 2.76 Low
50/50 Ford-AMC Suspension
79 F150 rear & 8.8 axles
Ford Racing 3.25 gears & 9" /w Detroit locker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote turbo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 9:12pm
The bottom looks like a hose pinch off tool
they call me Capt Fun.......!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote purple72Gremlin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 9:33pm
Wonder if the Ford tool was part of a model T tool kit? But the first year for the model T was 1908..........
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 9:42pm
Originally posted by purple72Gremlin purple72Gremlin wrote:

Wonder if the Ford tool was part of a model T tool kit? But the first year for the model T was 1908..........


Don't let the Ford tool throw you - it's not related to the Elgin tool, other than both came from Dad's house.
It just happens to be in the photo instead of taking two photos.
Would be nice to know about the Ford wrench but it's not related to the Elgin wrench.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote billd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 9:48pm
Originally posted by 304-dude 304-dude wrote:

Billd, my grandpa would call water pump pliers, alligator pliers. Though that design has much longer jaw, and built around the crescent wrench.

I figured having both shown, was a bit of a brain teaser on your part... trying to trick us in an odd way.


Not even close to water pump pliers. Water pump pliers are like what we call "Channel Lock" pliers - which like Crescent, is a NAME BRAND.
Water pumps used to have a packing nut - there was a treated packing, leather or rope, etc. and it was behind a nut with a shoulder which the shaft went through. 
As the packing wore and the pump started to leak around the shaft, you used water pump pliers to tighten the packing nut.
Again they are like channel lock pliers - the two jaws stay PARALLEL as you adjust them so the pliers jaws hit the two opposite sides of the water pump packing nut evenly, more like an adjustable wrench (what you'd call a Crescent Wrench which is a NAME BRAND).
Look at "channel lock" pliers - they can adjust to a great extent and the jaws can stay parallel to the sides of a packing nut, small or large, to snug up the packing and keep the pump from leaking..
The water pump pliers date back to very early cars with water pumps.
I collected and restored antique engines, tractors, etc. and worked on cars of ALL ages years ago.

Whatever that Elgin tool was sold for wasn't water pumps - not near big enough and the jaws do NOT stay parallel and they are more to wedge and grab than sit on the sides of a packing nut. Too small, not designed to get into the pump shaft packing nut and away from fan blades.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Someassemblyrqd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/25/2018 at 9:55pm
The Ford tool is interesting. To me, it appears to be a two-in-one tool with the square head at the handle end, as if it was to be used to take drain plugs out, similar to a differential plug.
Greg E.
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